“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “

The ketogenic diet focuses on cutting carb consumption and increasing fat intake to reach ketosis, a metabolic state in which the body begins burning fat for energy when glucose stores are running low. This typically involves decreasing intake of high-carb foods like grains, starches, legumes and sugary snacks while increasing consumption of healthy fats such as coconut oil, olive oil, grass-fed butter and ghee.


Today, the kids don’t even know where the bacon is coming from and how it arrives on their plates.  The meat industry is big in commercials addressed to kids, but they never honestly explain to the kids how is that piece of burger or bacon really made.  Why, because if they would show how the animals are slaughtered it would terrify the children and since feeding habits form early in life they would lose an entire generation of meat consumers.
Maybe you remember that some years back, cottage cheese was a staple in everyone’s low-fat diet. If you could get past the texture, you probably purchased a 6 pack and forced yourself to swallow it down mid-day because you thought it was the secret to making those love handles disappear. I’m not saying you were wrong—but you weren’t completely right.
If you have been struggling a bit with desserts that won’t break every rule of the keto way of life, here is the answer! Low-carb cheesecake can fill the void and let you enjoy your eating plan instead of missing out. This cheesecake is very, very rich, so you will probably find a small piece will satisfy your need for dessert. You can use toppings if you want to, but the plain vanilla taste is great as it is!
So that spoon you are using looks rather large, I’m not sure I have one that large, much less 6 of them. Yo do hang them individually, right? Also I’m not sure I’ll have the counter space or cups to do 6 separately… am I understanding this right? Are there other ideas for the hanging part? Have you tried any taco shell molds or the racks? Just curious if these would work also? 

You can still get a super crisp crust on chicken while keeping it moist and juicy on the inside. There are a few ways to do this, but the best method we’ve found is by grinding up pork rinds in the food processor and adding parmesan cheese to the mix. This will result in a fantastic crust all the way around your chicken, giving you the perfect keto fried chicken.
Although cashews are higher in carbs than most other nuts, they can still be enjoyed in moderation on a keto diet. They can be used in keto versions of popular dishes like cashew chicken. Also, they are great snacks. A serving is about 18 cashews, so it is especially helpful to pre-portion a serving of cashews instead of going to town on the whole container!

Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our culture right from birth and it is very hard to let go of. So is it safe to drink coffee on a ketogenic diet? Is it ideal? The answer is yes, let me explain. Most people refrain from taking coffee while on a keto diet but there is no evidence to show that it is harmful or damaging to the dietary effects of keto. However, and this is very important for even those not on keto, the effects of too much caffeine or any other stimulant are usually very volatile. Stimulants work by inhibiting the action of ‘depressant’ hormones in the body such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. However when taken regularly and in large amounts they stimulate the action of those hormones. Long term consumption and these hormones can get fatigued among other issues. At this level of high intake of caffeine – it will affect your keto adaptation. So a cup a day will not hurt your success with keto.
For anyone, regardless of any underlying health issues, the so-called keto flu is a possibility (and even likelihood) as your body adjusts to ketosis on the keto diet, says Tori Schmitt, RDN, founder of YES! Nutrition, LLC based in Dayton, Ohio. Fatigue, irritability, headaches, and nausea are all symptoms of the keto flu, Schmitt says. Fortunately, keto flu lasts only about one to two weeks.
Any of these sweeteners can help you stick with your ketogenic diet, keep your carbohydrates and sugars low and still obtain your sweet fix. Many are indigestible, which means they don't become carbohydrates at all, and your body just excretes them as waste. Just make sure that if you opt to use fruit powders like lucuma and monk fruit powder, no extra sugars have been added.
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
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