Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus. They also provide plenty of riboflavin, folate, pantothenic acid, sodium and potassium. Pumpkin seeds are 50% fat with a perfect balance of PUFA and MUFAs. Their high oil content makes them perfect for oil extraction. Pumpkin seed oil has a strong flavor that goes well in salad dressings and over meats.
Your body needs micro-nutrition and phyto-nutrition. Micro-nutrition is the vitamins and minerals found in both plants and animals, but phyto-nutrition is the special compounds found only in plants. Phyto means light, so it is the nutrition plants make from light using photosynthesis. Some of these compounds create the color or flavor of the plant. Some plants naturally have more of these special compounds than others, for example the bright yellow root, and cooking spice, turmeric contains curcumin. This phyto-nutrient has a potent anti-inflammatory effect. Some countries have already approved its use in the treatment of cancer.

Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.
Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.
Any of these sweeteners can help you stick with your ketogenic diet, keep your carbohydrates and sugars low and still obtain your sweet fix. Many are indigestible, which means they don't become carbohydrates at all, and your body just excretes them as waste. Just make sure that if you opt to use fruit powders like lucuma and monk fruit powder, no extra sugars have been added.
Because the body turns the fat into energy after its carbohydrate stores are depleted, the ketogenic diet has potential weight loss benefits. Research has shown that fats and proteins are the most satiating, while carbohydrates are the least. Because you feel full longer after eating fats and proteins, you reduce the number of calories you eat overall.

Today is the 3-year anniversary of Wholesome Yum! I am so humbled and grateful every single day that I get to do this. Thank you for being here… from the bottom of my heart! So to honor the anniversary of my little low carb recipe site (that maybe isn’t so little anymore?), I wanted to share with you one of my favorite low carb recipes. It’s not a celebratory cake or low carb dessert, but it’s a part of a popular low carb dinner staple… low carb tacos using keto cheese taco shells!
Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your diet should be comprised of fat, registered dietitian Stacey Mattinson told Everyday Health. Then, about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight is allowed. To determine carb allowance, Mattinson explained that you need to determine the net carbs. This can be done by subtracting fiber from a food’s total carbohydrates.
This recipe is just amazing!!! Thank you for sharing! Quick question for you: I came up with 6 net carbs a serving (using Wellbee’s flour and taking all swerve carbs out if the equation). I see your nutrition facts list 3 but then a comment you wrote said 5. Any idea which it actually is for you and any guesses what the discrepancies could be?? Thanks again!
Scientists are discovering that we need specific nutrition found only in plants to regulate our DNA. DNA is our genetics, but the regulation is our EPI-genetics. Basically your DNA is a template for your whole body, but it needs specific signals, from your diet, to regulate it how it works. Phyto-chemicals, found in abundance in low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit are crucial for DNA regulation. These plant based signals kick-start fertility, virility, libido, a positive mood and much more. That’s exactly what you want on keto, even more health, energy and vitality! In fact, eating enough nutritionally dense plants will prevent many of the diseases we find so commonly today.
“Dairy products are in general inflammatory, so I recommend most people stay away from them,” Hunnes says. Cream cheese also contains the milk protein casein, which Hunnes says is potentially carcinogenic.[2] Casein tends to be inflammatory, especially if you can’t tolerate it, which could create a possible link between cancer and the milk protein.
Low in fat and high in protein, cottage cheese has long been a staple for many dieters. However, people on the keto diet may want to be careful about eating cottage cheese in abundance. A single cup of small curd cottage cheese has roughly 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although it may be good to eat alone as a filling snack, be careful about pairing it with other foods that have traces of carbs, like avocados and nuts.
In 2018, sales of whole milk and whole-fat yogurt have increased by 1.6 percent and 11.6 percent, respectively, as fat-free yogurt has decreased by 10.9 percent. This shift in taste has birthed a slew of high-fat yogurts. Siggi’s 9 percent Triple Cream first came to market in 2017; it is now available nationwide in markets like Whole Foods, which is where I bought mine.

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.
This recipe uses kefir grains as the active ingredient to make the yogurt, and you can taste the mixture periodically to see how sour you like the yogurt. Once you have strained the mixture to remove the kefir grains, this yogurt can be stored in the refrigerator so you have a good supply for breakfast or as a snack for the kids after school. You can mix in some fruit or add in vanilla extract for extra flavor.
Getting the adequate amount of fat required to send your body into ketosis is fairly easy. Common sources of keto-approved fat include salmon, avocados, and coconut oil. For example, you could throw a couple of tablespoons of coconut oil into your favorite smoothie. Or you could pull a keto classic and mix in a tablespoon of butter or coconut oil into your coffee. When going keto, make sure to drink lots of water, resist processed foods, track what you eat, and monitor your blood sugar levels.

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.
Meat – Unprocessed meats are low carb and keto-friendly, and organic and grass-fed meat might be even healthier. But remember that keto is a high-fat diet, not high protein, so you don’t need huge amounts of meat. Excess protein (more than your body needs) is converted to glucose, making it harder to get into ketosis. A normal amount of meat is enough.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
×