MCT stands for medium-chain triglycerides. These are unique types of saturated fats that studies show your body can easily turn into ketones [12]. MCT oil is a supplement that is a purified source of these fats. Because MCTs don't require bile and enzymes for digestion, they get easily absorbed in your small intestine and they reach the liver quickly where they're turned into ketones.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
I know a man, 69 years old, that has had multiple knee surgeries. His knees are at the point where he can’t even run. If he takes a wrong step his knee give out on him. He always had a constant pain whenever he would stand up from sitting down. After being on a keto diet for a few weeks, his pain slowly started to go away. It became less and less until eventually there was no more pain.

Sorry about that, Shelly! No, not at all. I just have a process where I answer more involved questions in a separate batch from general thank you’s. It just makes it easier this way for me to get through so many comments that come in each day. I really do appreciate every one and answer them as soon as I can. I did answer your other question already. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting!
According to Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital, fruit juices and other from-concentrate products can increase your blood sugar and your calorie consumption. This means that juices are very keto unfriendly. You also want to be careful about making your own juice at home, even from vegetables. Juicing your fruits and vegetables concentrates the carbs and sugar and may be too much on your low-carb diet.

Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
A lot of people will argue that eating cheese on a ketogenic diet is harmful. The assumption that by eating cheese you are prone to taking in additional carbs, which is not 100% true. Yes, cheese does contains carbs so as long as you don’t go over the carb limit, you’ll be good. The thing to be concerned about is most individuals have a sensitivity to dairy products (and don’t know it), due to the casein in them. So if you have dietary sensitivity to it, avoid it (many people who suffer from a keto diet stall should cut out cheese). Cheese can be a great source of fat soluble vitamins. Eaten in moderation therefore, cheese is ok.
Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.

Nutrients often work synergistically in nature. For this reason, when the monounsaturated fats in avocados are paired with foods containing lycopene and beta-carotene they can actually increase the absorption of these antioxidants into the body. Monounsaturated fats also significantly decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels (23).  Avocados are one of the amazing ketogenic foods I eat every day!
Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.
The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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