I was about 2-3 oz shy of the cream cheese called for in the recipe (I’d forgotten that I had already used some for another recipe earlier) but decided I’d chance it and proceeded with the cheesecake anyway. Id originally intended to follow this recipe as written but that lasted all of 5 minutes– I can’t resist a tweak here or there. I wanted a little bit more lemon flavor in the filling to go with my blueberry topping, so I added some zest to the batter and then added a healthy sprinkling of cinnamon to the crust mixture. I highly recommend the addition of cinnamon for that Graham cracker crust flavor.

If, on the other hand, you lower the amount of carbs in your diet and increase the amount of fats, your body will go into a state known as ketosis. This is the source of the name 'ketogenic' in 'ketogenic diet’. In this state, your liver will break fats in your diet down and produce ketones, an energy source. Your body would pretty much rather use glucose as a primary source of energy but, when forced to look for an alternative, it will resort to burning fat instead.


Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese. 

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
Pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus. They also provide plenty of riboflavin, folate, pantothenic acid, sodium and potassium. Pumpkin seeds are 50% fat with a perfect balance of PUFA and MUFAs. Their high oil content makes them perfect for oil extraction. Pumpkin seed oil has a strong flavor that goes well in salad dressings and over meats.
Fruits with over 10g net carbs per 100g in weight. Depending on your carbohydrate tolerance and whether or not you are fat adapted, you may be stretching the boundaries of nutritional ketosis by eating fruit with higher carb content or more significant quantities of the low carb fruits listed. There will always be exceptions and outliers; be sure to reference the searchable low carb fruits list below to pinpoint carb counts if you are unsure.
Thank you SO much for the breakdown. This is an excellent list that I am going to take with me to the store from now on. I haven’t started on the diet as of yet because I was trying to put a grocery list together. This list has been one of VERY few that have the foods and the guided amount without having to pay an absurd amount of money for a list of food you can and cant eat. There weren’t any recommended amounts to eat for the meat section and wanted to know if you had any recommendations for portions. Thanks again for taking time to get wonderful information out there.

Eggs are also acceptable for you to eat on keto. The best part is that you don’t have to forgo the yolks, like many diets might require you to do. You can enjoy both the egg whites and the egg yolks when preparing your morning omelet. With only one gram of net carbs for each egg, you won’t have to feel guilty about having them as part of your diet.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)

There are quite a few flours out there made from nuts and seeds that can be used to substitute wheat flour. Gravies, sauces, low carb baked goods… it’s absolutely insane how creative people have gotten with low carb flours. Breads, cookies, you name it. I would recommend sticking to whole foods and wait to venture into baked goods territory. Get comfortable with what you can and can’t eat, get into ketosis, and then start experimenting with ketofied versions of your favorite foods.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
Another appropriate fruit on the keto diet, ½ cup of cubed raw cantaloupe has only 5.8 g of net carbohydrates. The same serving size is also low in calories, with 27 g, as well as in sugar, with 6.3 g. Plus,it offers vitamins and nutrients such as 214 mg of potassium (4.6 percent DV), 29.4 mg of vitamin C ( 49 percent DV), and 2,706 IU of vitamin A ( 54.1 percent DV). Cantaloupes are delicious and refreshing, and eating the fruit may help you stay full longer.
The question of what kinds of fat one should eat is still pretty much unresolved. What we know today for sure is this: It doesn’t really matter how much fat you eat, so long as you don’t eat too many calories. (Fats contain 9 calories per gram, compared to carbs and protein, which each have 4.) We also know that trans fats are bad, and we kinda-sorta think that unsaturated fats might be better than saturated fats. Beyond this, we can’t say too much for sure. In terms of food trends, it doesn’t really matter because fads are rarely backed by concrete fact.
Prior to your response, I did make a cheesecake, using your recipe for the filling (so delish, and I received all favorable comments on it). Due to the cost difference between almond and coconut flour, I did find a recipe similar to the one you shared in your response, 1/2 C melted butter (1 stick) whisked until fully blended with 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp vanilla. Then slowly mix in 3/4 C sifted coconut flour. Kneaded for about a minute, adding coconut flour until not sticky. I simply then pressed crust into only the bottom portion of the springform pan, used a fork to punch multiple holes in it, then baked at 400° for 10 minutes. I let it fully cool before adding filling, then used your perfect instructions to bake the cheesecake. Love, love, love this recipe. I’m a happy Type-II Diabetic!
Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you.
Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.

This is my own personal alternative, though I've recently fallen back in love with Greek yogurt again (normally the texture and waxy coating it leaves in my mouth are very off-putting...). Looking at this now, I could easily see adding an unflavored/flavored protein powder and/or collagen to make this have more of a protein content. You might even mix pureed cottage cheese with the sour cream. I'm not sure what that would do for texture... Possibilities are endless, really, once you master the initial recipe.


I made this on Monday, let it sit in the fridge overnight and it was fabulous last night (Tuesday) and still fabulous tonight (Wednesday). My only minor issue was that the cream cheese didn’t seem to get smooth after blending and so after the cake sat and we ate it, you could taste the crumbles of cream cheese. When I started to bend the mixture (using hand mixer) I started off slow, then sped up the speed thinking that would help remove the clumps. But then I saw your note about not over-mixing because that would cause air pockets. I continued to blend but at a lower speed then just put it in the pan to bake..thinking maybe the clumps would sort themselves out while baking. What do you recommend for next time? Either way, it was fabulous! Thank you!!!
Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!
Hi Dorothy, The ingredients don’t scale perfectly to a 6-inch pie, but can be pretty close. If you enter “10” in the box that lists the number of servings, it will convert the amounts for you. Some amounts turn out a little odd (like 1.88 eggs), so with those it should be ok to round up. The baking time will need to decrease with a smaller cheesecake, as well.
Not all nuts and seeds are created equal. Although all of them tend to be a high-fat source with low to moderate protein and carbohydrates, each contains a different nutritional profile. Additionally, each contains a unique blend of compounds, vitamins, minerals, etc. Below, I have listed a few of the nuts and seeds you may want to emphasize while on a ketogenic diet, and some that you may want to eat less often.

With the higher levels of antioxidants found in matcha tea, this smoothie is guaranteed to get your day off to a healthy start! It is thickened with chia seeds and would make a lovely refreshing drink for breakfast. Some green smoothies can be quite a vibrant color, but this one is a more gentle shade, so not as off-putting for green smoothie novices!


The nominal amount of carbs allowed on keto makes it challenging to find snacks that won't screw up your diet. But nuts should be a go-to for any keto enthusiast, as they're high in fat without being loaded with too many carbs. If you're looking for the lowest carb nuts, add these to your emergency snack stash so you're prepared when hunger strikes.
The top three “fruits” on this list hardly exemplify the prototypical image of fruits in our minds, and it should come as no surprise. Fruits are typically banished from everyone’s keto diet shopping list, and for good reason. They simply pack too much sugar, and sugar is what we’re supposed to be avoiding at all costs, right? While this assertion may be true for most fruits, it turns out that there are a few delicious berries that provide very manageable carb content at a reasonable serving size. Two ounces of raspberries every day would certainly be enough for most people. You can always grab another 2oz for a total of 14 grams of net carbs. This will require some macro gymnastics if you’re hoping to enjoy balanced meals for the rest of the day, however.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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