To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.

I made this on Monday, let it sit in the fridge overnight and it was fabulous last night (Tuesday) and still fabulous tonight (Wednesday). My only minor issue was that the cream cheese didn’t seem to get smooth after blending and so after the cake sat and we ate it, you could taste the crumbles of cream cheese. When I started to bend the mixture (using hand mixer) I started off slow, then sped up the speed thinking that would help remove the clumps. But then I saw your note about not over-mixing because that would cause air pockets. I continued to blend but at a lower speed then just put it in the pan to bake..thinking maybe the clumps would sort themselves out while baking. What do you recommend for next time? Either way, it was fabulous! Thank you!!!
On your keto food list, stick to low-glycemic sweeteners to avoid spikes in blood sugar, and avoid fillers and binders such as maltodextrin and dextrose, which can spike blood sugar and contain sneaky carbs. Sugar alcohols such as maltitol or xylitol may read as no sugar on a label, but be aware that they will still cause moderate glycemic response when digested.
Low carb vegetables that are technically fruits. Tomatoes, tomatillos, avocados, pretty much any seed bearing vegetable… those “veggies” are fruits, botanically speaking. I’m not here to debate what a fruit or veggie is, but I won’t lie that it irks me just a little when I see people preach that you “can’t eat fruit on the keto diet” while diving face first into a pile of avocados or zucchini noodles. Maybe it’s the biologist in me (or maybe I’m just “that guy”), but you can and probably already are eating fruit on the keto diet.
Yogurt is full of carbs so it would be better to eat a carbmaster like Kroger sells if you want to eat yogurt. Yes it is low fat but I like to add whipping cream for the extra good fat. Also, KETO is not a DIET! It is a way of eating. You will eat this way from now on. There is no eating KETO, then going back to regular way of eating. Your regular way got you in the mess in the first place. Once you go real KETO, it’s with you forever.
I only wish I could make a crust a bit.. crustier? I’ve had a lot of these types of deserts with the mostly-almond-flour crusts, and they always have a bit of a texture issue. No real crunch. But I will experiment. I once made applie pie crumb topping with almond flour, butter, Erythritol and cinnamon, with a little coconut flour, and baked it in a pan, then crumbled it up. I had a lot more Erythritol in that though, and it got “crispy”. Might try a variation on that for this next time.

Limes and lemons have very little sugar: just 1.1 grams and 1.5 grams per fruit, respectively. Citrus fruits like these can be used in keto-friendly foods like cauliflower hummus, mayonnaise and smoothies. A quick twist in any meat or fish recipe will greatly enhance most meals. Lemons and limes are also a source of vitamins, minerals and antioxidants, which have been linked to various health benefits.

Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
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