Easily incorporate coconut flakes into your diet by adding them to trail mix, ketogenic desserts, smoothies, or using as an alternative to bread crumbs in coating poultry. Try this brand of coconut flakes by Lets Do Organics for coconut flakes with no added sweeteners or preservatives.  Nutiva makes a great coconut butter that they call coconut manna here

If you can’t find Carb Master milk at your local grocery store, you can easily substitute another dairy option. When selecting an alternative source for your keto yogurt, remember that keto dairy should be organic, grass fed and high-fat. Avoid 1% and 2% dairy products, which are typically loaded with carbohydrates. Instead, select raw milk, heavy cream or heavy whipping cream.


Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you.
I stay away from any Greek yogurt with less than 10 % m.f. Lots of brands out there with +10% m.f., like Greek god, astro, Olympic, etc. If you can't find it in the grocery store, here's a tip I learned from a friend: get the highest percentage m.f. Greek yogurt you can find, then put it in a salad spinner and draw as much water out. The yogurt water is full of lactose (milk sugar). You will be left with a thicker yogurt that contains more fat (and protein) per portion, and less carbohydrates. You can then add heavy cream (+35% m.f. ) to thin out the strained yogurt to desired consistency or fat content.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.
Seasonings and sauces are a tricky part of ketogenic diet foods, but people use them on a regular basis to add flavor to their meals. The easiest way to remain strict here is to avoid processed foods. There are many low carb condiments and products on the market, and there’s no way to list them all. A handful of them are great, but the majority use high glycemic index sweeteners – which you want to avoid.

Time to address the elephant in the room. Rhubarb is not a fruit. Or at least, rhubarb fails the eye test at first glance. It looks like red celery. When raw, it feels like celery. Hard, bitter, fibrous, and about as enjoyable as a spoonful of cough syrup. Except, that’s not rhubarb at all. Rhubarb measures like a vegetable but tastes like a fruit. It cooks like a fruit and fits the sweet profile you may be craving on a Tuesday night. Reduce 4 ounces of chopped rhubarb with 4 ounces of strawberries, and you have sweet fruit topping that barely skims 9 grams of net carbs, or roughly 4.5 net carbs per serving.
However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.
While I see your point with regards to animal suffering (which is an ongoing issue), this doesn't have to be the case and on the contrary, people are more and more interested in meat from ethical sources. Watching a TED talk may be an eye opener but we should all do some research on human evolution. Your comment is biased because it only looks at one side of the argument (not to mention that some points are totally wrong, such as comparing human digestion to elephants??)
DO avoid fast food. I understand sometimes it might be the only option, but if you aren’t desperate don’t eat it.  I have found it doesn’t even taste good anymore. Even though you can get bunless burgers at McDonald’s or wherever, fast food just isn’t healthy. It is full of chemicals and preservatives and they usually don’t even use real cheese and the meat often has fillers. Even the salads could have hidden sugars.

You can have almonds, walnuts, cashews, sunflower seeds, pistachios, chestnuts, and pumpkin seeds. Chia seeds and flaxseeds can also be added to meals, such as a delicious smoothie. Both nuts and seeds are high in fiber, which are going to help you feel fuller longer and more satisfied overall. Nuts are also beneficial because they’ve been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and other ailments. 


Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
The ketogenic diet basically changes the metabolic fuel of your body to make it lose weight. You’re not starving yourself of calories. You’re having a good amount of calories, which means you’re eating enough to keep you going. All you’re avoiding are carbohydrates. This gives you massive benefits, including improved health, weight loss, and better performance physically and mentally.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
Updated | Ketogenics is the latest diet darling in the nutrition world, particularly because of celebrity backers like Halle Berry. In essence, the keto diet is a low-carb diet that emphasizes eating moderate amounts of protein but plentiful amounts of fat, such as avocados and cheese. The thinking: By eliminating carbohydrates, your body will instead burn stored fat through a process known as ketosis, which helps drop pounds. Although, this diet has become trendy in recent years, it was originally used in the 1920s as an epilepsy treatment. 

Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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