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Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you. 

When your body is low in potassium, it comes with an array of possible side effects, including: high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis, cancer, digestive disorders, and infertility. Getting plenty of potassium in your diet can possibly prevent you from developing one of these health issues. Potassium may also help improve your cholesterol and triglyceride levels. 

Why Greek yogurt? Well, if you are not on an absolutely zero-carb diet and don’t mind some dairy, either, you must admit that Greek yogurt is one of the most enjoyable snacks out there. Moreover, it is supposed to be full of the good little guys that help the gut remain healthy. Other than that, it is a soft and fluffy alternative to cream cheese. While I don’t mind the cheese, I do find it can mess with me if I eat too much of it. Besides, I’ve seen people complaining they hated cream cheese pancakes and wanted an alternative. Hopefully, this recipe comes in handy for some of them.
Maca is a kind of turnip from Peru. It is nicknamed “nature’s Viagra” for its libido boosting properties. Although it contains 60% NET carbs you only need a teaspoonful to give you a sweet tasting boost. A few grams of this superfood won’t take you out of ketosis. It’s adaptogenic, meaning it will boost your body, mind and mojo in multiple ways. Aloe Vera is a species of cactus related to the lily flower. It is antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal. It heals the gut and is used to successfully reduce the effects of radiation and stabilize cancerous tumors. It is a bit slimy to eat but can be added to salads and shakes and has zero carbs. This is a superhero in the plant kingdom and its zero carb status makes it perfect for keto.
My reason for starting Keto was two-fold. First and foremost I desperately wanted to lose weight, but I also wanted to get off all the medication I was on for T2 Diabetes and high blood pressure.  The reason I stay Keto is to keep the weight off of course and to stay off medication, but also I want overall health and well being. I want to stay energized, be strong, and be as chemical and preservative free as possible.
Dehydrated fruit. When fruit is dehydrated, the moisture is removed. This process makes dehydrated fruit more nutrient dense than its fresh counterpart and ensures higher carb and sugar count by weight. Take apricots for example. In 100 grams of raw apricot, there are 9 grams of net carbohydrates. But in 100 grams of dehydrated apricot, the net carb count skyrockets to 82 grams of net carbs. Pretty significant difference, and you’ll see the same thing with plums vs. prunes, raisins, cran-raisins, and all the other dried variety of fruits.  
Pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus. They also provide plenty of riboflavin, folate, pantothenic acid, sodium and potassium. Pumpkin seeds are 50% fat with a perfect balance of PUFA and MUFAs. Their high oil content makes them perfect for oil extraction. Pumpkin seed oil has a strong flavor that goes well in salad dressings and over meats.
If you have been struggling a bit with desserts that won’t break every rule of the keto way of life, here is the answer! Low-carb cheesecake can fill the void and let you enjoy your eating plan instead of missing out. This cheesecake is very, very rich, so you will probably find a small piece will satisfy your need for dessert. You can use toppings if you want to, but the plain vanilla taste is great as it is!
Whether you munch on them on their own or pair them with melt-in-your-mouth Havarti, Kalamata olives are one of our go-to snacks both on and off keto. Six plump olives boast just 35 calories and 130 milligrams of sodium, a low count to keep bloating at bay. Most of the fat content in olives is monounsaturated, and more specifically oleic acid, which has been linked to anti-inflammatory and heart-protective benefits.
Here it is, the definitive low carb fruits list! This list comes highly requested by my readers who need to know: what’s the verdict on carbs in fruit? Is there any such thing as “keto fruit” or is it too good to be true? After receiving such positive feedback on our low carb vegetable list, I wanted to create a searchable, sortable guide to display a low carb fruits list as well.
This milk yogurt contains just 1 gram of net carbs, giving you a little wiggle room when it comes to carbohydrates. If you are craving additional sweetness, you can choose to sweeten your low carb yogurt with a keto-friendly sweetener, like stevia or monk fruit. You could also top with fresh fruit like blueberries or raspberries, avoiding high-carb fruits. Or, make a yogurt parfait with chia seeds and keto yogurt topped with homemade whipped cream, made with heavy whipping cream or coconut cream.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.
I’ve made this cheesecake twice now, and it is sooooooo easy and delicious! I’ve gotten great results by just following the recipe as you wrote it. I radically changed mine and my husband’s diet after we got the news that his blood sugar was a bit too high (pre-diabetic). His blood sugar is normal when he eats according to keto principles, and it’s nice for me to be able to give him a treat once in a while that won’t spike his blood sugar. Thanks so much for this recipe!

Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
Most vegan protein sources (lentils, beans) are way too carb-heavy for keto, even if you don’t care that much about sticking to a strict Paleo diet. But if you eat eggs and dairy, it’s definitely possible to have a vegetarian keto diet that’s adequate in protein, reasonably varied and quite tasty. It would likely be lower in protein than a meat-heavy keto diet, but if that works well for you, then it’s totally fine!
Eggs are also acceptable for you to eat on keto. The best part is that you don’t have to forgo the yolks, like many diets might require you to do. You can enjoy both the egg whites and the egg yolks when preparing your morning omelet. With only one gram of net carbs for each egg, you won’t have to feel guilty about having them as part of your diet.

Any of these sweeteners can help you stick with your ketogenic diet, keep your carbohydrates and sugars low and still obtain your sweet fix. Many are indigestible, which means they don't become carbohydrates at all, and your body just excretes them as waste. Just make sure that if you opt to use fruit powders like lucuma and monk fruit powder, no extra sugars have been added.


Low in fat and high in protein, cottage cheese has long been a staple for many dieters. However, people on the keto diet may want to be careful about eating cottage cheese in abundance. A single cup of small curd cottage cheese has roughly 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although it may be good to eat alone as a filling snack, be careful about pairing it with other foods that have traces of carbs, like avocados and nuts.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”

Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”

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