However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.
This content is strictly the opinion of Dr. Josh Axe and is for informational and educational purposes only. It is not intended to provide medical advice or to take the place of medical advice or treatment from a personal physician. All readers/viewers of this content are advised to consult their doctors or qualified health professionals regarding specific health questions. Neither Dr. Axe nor the publisher of this content takes responsibility for possible health consequences of any person or persons reading or following the information in this educational content. All viewers of this content, especially those taking prescription or over-the-counter medications, should consult their physicians before beginning any nutrition, supplement or lifestyle program.

Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
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The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.
Hi Fariba, Yes, you’d need more of the crust for sure, probably about 25% more (multiply the amount of each ingredient in the crust by 1.25). For the filling, you could probably keep it the same to avoid messing with conversions, and the cheesecake would just be a shorter height. Some recipes use sour cream for texture or moisture, but this recipe doesn’t need it.
One thing to keep in mind: If it's whipped cream you're after (and not whipping cream, to add to your coffee), it might be best to, uh, whip it up yourself (one cup of the whipped stuff has under four grams of carbs and just over 43 grams of fat), since most store-bought versions have added sugar. To do that, all you need is heavy whipping cream, a hand mixer and a mixing bowl, and you whisk until the cream becomes fluffy. Add a pinch of pure vanilla extract for some flavor.
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.
To make this Tasty Cheese Shelled Keto Chicken Quesadillas, your preheat oven to 400 F. Then, cover a pizza pan with Parchment Paper (NOT wax paper). Mix the Cheeses together, then evenly spread them over the parchment paper (in a circle shape). Bake the cheese shell for 5 minutes. Pour off any extra oil as soon as it comes out of the oven. Then, place the chicken over half of the cheese shell.  Add the sliced peppers, diced tomato and the chopped green onion. Fold the Cheese shell in half over the chicken and veggies. Press it firmly, then return it to the oven for another 4- 5 minutes. Serve with sour cream, salsa and guacamole. Garnish with chopped fresh basil, parsley or cilantro.
“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley

Lower-carb veggies, like cucumber, celery, asparagus, squash, and zucchini; cruciferous veggies, like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts; nightshades, like eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers; root vegetables, like onion, garlic, and radishes, and sea veggies, like nori and kombu. The guidelines are simple: focus on dark, leafy greens, then the stuff that grows above the ground, then root vegetables.
Michelle, I second Libby’s remarks about “The fear of saturated fat is so old fashioned and outdated. Research shows saturated fat is healthy, stable and protective.”. In addition to her link, get a used copy (or new) of Nora Gedgaudas’s book Primal Body Primal Mind. Dr. Eric Berg has put out many youtube videos about Keto and intermittent fasting. Search his name with weight, or keto, or intermittent fasting, or phytic acid. They are some interesting videos.
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
Watermelon is a staple summer fruit and another low-carb way to help satisfy your sweet tooth on keto. Each ½ cup of diced watermelon has 5.4 g of net carbs. It’s also an acceptable choice when dieting because of its high water content. The ½ cup serving size of watermelon has about 23 calories and 4.7 g of sugar. This juicy fruit also offers 432 IU of vitamin A, which is 8.6 percent of the DV.
Hey Jessica, sorry it took a bit to respond. I looked up the ingredients and see that it has 18g carbs per serving and cane sugar is listed as one of the main ingredients. (https://taldepot.com/body-armor-orange-mango-sports-drink-28-oz-plastic-bottles-pack-of-12.html) This type of drink wouldn’t fit into a keto diet. La Croix is my favorite drink, but it’s not sweet. Maybe some of the readers could offer a good substitution for you?
Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.
Berries are an excellent source of antioxidants and taste delicious in a keto dessert. A handful of these fruits is ok from a carb perspective but just once a day. Blackberries, blueberries, boysenberries, raspberries, strawberries and cranberries are keto friendly fruits. Topped with cream they make a lovely sweet and simple treat. Frozen with cream and blended up they make a natural and nutritious ice-cream! Another tasty and nutritious plant category are herbs and spices.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.
Hi Viola, Sorry you had issues with the cheesecake. Did you use the exact same ingredients? Did you check the video? I’d be happy to help troubleshoot if you can point to where it went differently for you. As for cracking, this is likely due to either drastic temperature changes or over-baking. Check the tips in the post above. Finally, instructions for the raspberry sauce are in the recipe notes on the recipe card.

Without too much vamping, I’ll just come clean and say that the Goods team loved the high-fat yogurts: The plain-flavored Peak tasted sumptuously round, with a sweet fattiness that made up for lack of sugar. The vanilla-flavored Peak was also delicious — a tangier, more chill cousin of panna cotta. By far, we agreed the Siggi’s Triple Cream was best. The 9 percent fat was luscious, but not so luscious that it wasn’t immediately recognizable as yogurt. We all thought the raspberry flavor would be great if it was, like, 3:30 pm and you were coming out of a doctor’s appointment and you wanted to eat something substantial that wouldn’t spoil your dinner.
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
If, on the other hand, you lower the amount of carbs in your diet and increase the amount of fats, your body will go into a state known as ketosis. This is the source of the name 'ketogenic' in 'ketogenic diet’. In this state, your liver will break fats in your diet down and produce ketones, an energy source. Your body would pretty much rather use glucose as a primary source of energy but, when forced to look for an alternative, it will resort to burning fat instead.
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