This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
Any suggestion to substitute cream cheese with something else (not dairy and keto-friendly)? I’ve decided to try this recipe using ghee instead of butter because it doesn’t hurt me, but it’s the only “dairy” that I tolerate (if perfectly clarified, of course… no lactose nor casein allowed for me). And I’ll omit the fruity topping, but I’m thinking to experiment with a home-made sugar free “coffee syrup” using powdered decaffeinated coffee, some kind of thickening (maybe gelatin) and powdered erythritol. Do you think it could be fine?
Try to replace all soda and juice consumption with something that has no sugar or only trace amounts of sugar. Switch out fruit juices for low-carb smoothies and tea. Tea comes in a variety of flavors that can help you get through the day if you get tired of water. There are a variety of different smoothies you can make for a meal replacement or as a quick snack as well.

The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.


Yogurt topped with a few nuts might seem like a no-brainer keto snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you opt for flavored yogurt, like vanilla, that carb count doubles to 24 grams of carbohydrates for 6 ounces. Your best bet is to choose plain Greek yogurt, which has as little as five grams of carbohydrates for a 7 ounce serving.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.
So that spoon you are using looks rather large, I’m not sure I have one that large, much less 6 of them. Yo do hang them individually, right? Also I’m not sure I’ll have the counter space or cups to do 6 separately… am I understanding this right? Are there other ideas for the hanging part? Have you tried any taco shell molds or the racks? Just curious if these would work also?
The recipe as-is is sugar-free but does not use any stevia, only erythritol. You could use stevia, but the amount would need to be different – I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use. Pure stevia is also sugar-free and does not have any calories that humans are able to absorb. But, it’s very concentrated and many stevia products contain fillers. Depending on what brand you used, other ingredients may not be sugar-free (for example, some use maltodextrin as a filler, which is actually sugar). I recommend looking at my sweetener guide for comparison, and read the ingredients label on the product you have.
While this particular recipe uses dairy, you can easily substitute one of the above alternatives to make your yogurt dairy-free. Simply follow the same fermentation process, combining the probiotic capsules and guar gum with your milk or heavy cream of choice. You could also choose to make your own almond milk (or other nut milk) by soaking almonds overnight and straining with a cheesecloth.
You can have almonds, walnuts, cashews, sunflower seeds, pistachios, chestnuts, and pumpkin seeds. Chia seeds and flaxseeds can also be added to meals, such as a delicious smoothie. Both nuts and seeds are high in fiber, which are going to help you feel fuller longer and more satisfied overall. Nuts are also beneficial because they’ve been linked to a reduced risk of heart disease and other ailments. 

Rami co-founded Tasteaholics with Vicky at the start of 2015 to master the art of creating extremely delicious food while researching the truth behind nutrition, dieting and overall health. You can usually find him marketing, coding or coming up with the next crazy idea because he can't sit still for too long. His top read is The 4-Hour Workweek and he loves listening to Infected Mushroom in his spare time.
They also often have specific beneficial properties and are used traditionally both medicinally and in cooking. Cinnamon for example lowers blood sugar and suppresses appetite and protects against disease. Ginger is another potent herb which is an antioxidant and is anti-inflammatory. Capsaicin from hot peppers speeds up fat metabolism and reduces inflammation. Parsley is popular herb which removes heavy metals from the body and is packed with vitamins. Rosemary reduces inflammation in the brain treating headaches and boosting mental energy. Herbs and spices add color, flavor and novelty to keto meals. You can make the same dish taste totally different by adding a few fresh herbs.

Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your diet should be comprised of fat, registered dietitian Stacey Mattinson told Everyday Health. Then, about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight is allowed. To determine carb allowance, Mattinson explained that you need to determine the net carbs. This can be done by subtracting fiber from a food’s total carbohydrates.
Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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