In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.
Nuts are a great source of fat, and can be a great keto snack. However, it is easy to go overboard. Most nuts are calorically dense, so they can be easy to over-consume. On more than one occasion, I have found myself sitting next to the jar of nuts and “just having a few more”. Before I was aware, I had probably consumed 800 extra calories of nuts! Depending on your goals, consuming nuts in excess can hinder your progress. That’s not to say that nuts are off limits, though. Instead, portion out single servings beforehand. Avoid sitting down with the entire container. This goes for every other snack, but I feel that nuts are one of the easiest things to overeat.
I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
So I made the recipe for 16 slices. That was the default, but there was enough filling for two of the pies and only enough crust for one pie. I tried to adjust it to just 8 slices before I made the recipe but the amounts were really dumb. The amounts were in decimals for cups instead of fractions and weird amounts for tablespoons like 0.5 tablespoon, etc.

This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.


Oleuropein has been shown to produce numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial benefits. Olive consumption increases glutathione production in the cardiovascular system and helps to prevent cancer cell growth throughout the body. (34, 33)  Olives and olive oil are great foods to eat on a ketogenic diet.  I like the pitted Kalamata olives here

Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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