Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!)
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
Spices have carbs in them, so make sure you are adding them to your counts. Sea salt is preferred over table salt, as it is usually mixed with powdered dextrose. Most pre-made spice mixes will have sugars added to them, so make sure you read the nutrition label beforehand to make sure you know what’s inside. If you have the choice, never include added sugar into your spice blends or food.
Rounding errors are common for cream cheese. Most nutrition labels, including products at the store, round up or down to the nearest whole amount of carbs, but the serving is only an ounce. Since this sugar-free cheesecake recipe calls for 32 ounces of cream cheese, rounding up adds up to a big difference! The nutrition information on the recipe card uses the exact carb count directly from the USDA National Nutrient Database, which is most accurate. If you want to see those values for all low carb foods, and see the values used to calculate my nutrition labels, you can find the full low carb & keto food list here.
Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).

This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.
Haven’t heard of The ketogenic diet (often called keto)?  It’s a very low-carb, high-fat diet that shares similarities to paleo, Whole30, and Atkins. It involves drastically reducing carbohydrate intake, and replacing it with fat. When your body switches to burning fat for its primary fuel source, that’s when you hit ketosis. While on the Keto diet you’re supposed to get at least 70 percent of your calories from fat, 15 to 25 percent from protein, and 10 percent from carbohydrates. You’re supposed to avoid all grains, legumes, root vegetables, fruit, (except berries) and sugar.
I was about 2-3 oz shy of the cream cheese called for in the recipe (I’d forgotten that I had already used some for another recipe earlier) but decided I’d chance it and proceeded with the cheesecake anyway. Id originally intended to follow this recipe as written but that lasted all of 5 minutes– I can’t resist a tweak here or there. I wanted a little bit more lemon flavor in the filling to go with my blueberry topping, so I added some zest to the batter and then added a healthy sprinkling of cinnamon to the crust mixture. I highly recommend the addition of cinnamon for that Graham cracker crust flavor.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV). 
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