This cheesecake is in the oven baking as we speak. I did use crushed pecans with some cinnamon added along with your other ingredients. The filling looks and tastes AMAZING (I know, I know, it has raw eggs in it). I was about to give up on Keto because quite frankly every recipe I tried just wasnt tasting great. Then I found your site! I also made some of the caramel sauce and I must say that is fantastic all on it’s own. Thank you so much for sharing your recipes! I look forward to making many more.
Still iffy about certain fruits? Double check the carbohydrate counts in a nutrition database to make sure your fruit of choice is not too sugary. The carb counts can really creep up on you if you don’t track and measure. Be careful! Don’t let your sweet tooth take over your portion control or you will kick your cute little butt right out of ketosis.

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley
This recipe is quite straightforward and simple to follow, but the results are amazing! You have the flavor and consistency of cheesecake, but without the high carb content. You can even make it more mousse-like in the middle by beating more air into your filling ingredients, which would be a good idea for a lighter dessert after a heavier meal. This can be served without the sour cream topping if you want to.
Fitness is my passion. Exercising and nutrition are my passion. I love sharing my knowledge with others... so that they can live happier, healthier, and more fulfilled lives. You can find me publishing on health and nutrition over at altprotein.com. If I am not exploring the peaks and valleys of NH I am off traveling abroad, learning new ideas and practicing new wellness techniques.
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