Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
Articles and information on this website may only be copied, reprinted, or redistributed with written permission (but please ask, we like to give written permission!) The purpose of this Blog is to encourage the free exchange of ideas. The entire contents of this website is based upon the opinions of Dave Asprey, unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective authors, who may retain copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the personal research and experience of Dave Asprey and the community. We will attempt to keep all objectionable messages off this site; however, it is impossible to review all messages immediately. All messages expressed on The Bulletproof Forum or the Blog, including comments posted to Blog entries, represent the views of the author exclusively and we are not responsible for the content of any message.

Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
Fruits with over 10g net carbs per 100g in weight. Depending on your carbohydrate tolerance and whether or not you are fat adapted, you may be stretching the boundaries of nutritional ketosis by eating fruit with higher carb content or more significant quantities of the low carb fruits listed. There will always be exceptions and outliers; be sure to reference the searchable low carb fruits list below to pinpoint carb counts if you are unsure.
Not all nuts and seeds are created equal. Although all of them tend to be a high-fat source with low to moderate protein and carbohydrates, each contains a different nutritional profile. Additionally, each contains a unique blend of compounds, vitamins, minerals, etc. Below, I have listed a few of the nuts and seeds you may want to emphasize while on a ketogenic diet, and some that you may want to eat less often.
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
Spices have carbs in them, so make sure you are adding them to your counts. Sea salt is preferred over table salt, as it is usually mixed with powdered dextrose. Most pre-made spice mixes will have sugars added to them, so make sure you read the nutrition label beforehand to make sure you know what’s inside. If you have the choice, never include added sugar into your spice blends or food.

Why Greek yogurt? Well, if you are not on an absolutely zero-carb diet and don’t mind some dairy, either, you must admit that Greek yogurt is one of the most enjoyable snacks out there. Moreover, it is supposed to be full of the good little guys that help the gut remain healthy. Other than that, it is a soft and fluffy alternative to cream cheese. While I don’t mind the cheese, I do find it can mess with me if I eat too much of it. Besides, I’ve seen people complaining they hated cream cheese pancakes and wanted an alternative. Hopefully, this recipe comes in handy for some of them.
DO avoid fast food. I understand sometimes it might be the only option, but if you aren’t desperate don’t eat it.  I have found it doesn’t even taste good anymore. Even though you can get bunless burgers at McDonald’s or wherever, fast food just isn’t healthy. It is full of chemicals and preservatives and they usually don’t even use real cheese and the meat often has fillers. Even the salads could have hidden sugars.
Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.

My reason for starting Keto was two-fold. First and foremost I desperately wanted to lose weight, but I also wanted to get off all the medication I was on for T2 Diabetes and high blood pressure.  The reason I stay Keto is to keep the weight off of course and to stay off medication, but also I want overall health and well being. I want to stay energized, be strong, and be as chemical and preservative free as possible.

Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.


Thinking back about the times I kicked grains and sugar out of my life, I try to remember the very first sweet low-carb treat I got my hands dirty with. I am pretty sure it was keto pancakes. I even dare to think that keto or some kind of low-carb pancakes was the sweet “first-time” for most of us. Naturally, it is a treat that the majority of us used to enjoy relatively frequently in our high-carb times.
How can you promise that when everything seems to need to be handmade? That is either a major time commitment, shopping, prepping, cooking, cleaning, or the most basic-bland thing ever. This would all be very good for me, but I don’t see how it is feasibly sustainable. Everyone seems to say things like ‘oh it only takes an hour’. All I can think is, wow you have an hour for this every meal? That and I live by myself and fresh food goes bad quickly, that gets really expensive really quickly or requires that you go to the store every other day. I really want to do this long term, but please, how is it realistically possible? I don’t want every meal to mean that I have to clean a pot, a pan, 2 knives, a stirring spoon, a cutting board, etc etc.

Hi Dorothy, The ingredients don’t scale perfectly to a 6-inch pie, but can be pretty close. If you enter “10” in the box that lists the number of servings, it will convert the amounts for you. Some amounts turn out a little odd (like 1.88 eggs), so with those it should be ok to round up. The baking time will need to decrease with a smaller cheesecake, as well.


There’s actually a name for that way of eating: dirty keto. Instead of focusing on healthy fats like avocado and olive oil, it essentially allows for anything that fits within your daily allotment of carbs (usually around 20-50 grams). If the below foods are part of your ketogenic diet, then you’re not eating as clean as you think — and you’re definitely not eating Bulletproof. Keep reading to see which foods you should get rid of — and why.
I am slightly (?) confused—in the article you use phrases such as “the low carb yogurt theory”–it can be assumed–expect approximately–The actual number of carbs has been proven– Theory, assumed, expect, and “has been proven” just seem to be at odds with each other…I’ve given up Yogurt while on a keto diet and miss it. How are these claims substantiated? Appreciate any assistance you can provide..Brian Jamieson
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
Being rich in healthy oils makes these nuts particularly good for cardiovascular health [12]. Studies on macadamia oil show that it reduces inflammation and shrinks the size of fat cells [13]. This is helpful for people with obesity as inflammation and enlarged fat cells both make the disorder difficult to manage. Besides a perfect macros profile, macadamia nuts are also a good source of B vitamins, iron, manganese, and zinc.
I'm asking because I'm on keto diet and finding how to get as much fiber as possible.If I need at least 25g of fiber/day(WHO), and for example not to exceed 50g of net carbs/day on Keto the math is easy. I can technically eat only food with max. ratio 1g fibre to 2g net carb - it means approx. half of nuts & seeds you listed. But If I multiply the fibre content by 0.3 to have just soluble fibre, I can't eat almost no nuts & seeds 😊
With the higher levels of antioxidants found in matcha tea, this smoothie is guaranteed to get your day off to a healthy start! It is thickened with chia seeds and would make a lovely refreshing drink for breakfast. Some green smoothies can be quite a vibrant color, but this one is a more gentle shade, so not as off-putting for green smoothie novices!
If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)

There’s actually a name for that way of eating: dirty keto. Instead of focusing on healthy fats like avocado and olive oil, it essentially allows for anything that fits within your daily allotment of carbs (usually around 20-50 grams). If the below foods are part of your ketogenic diet, then you’re not eating as clean as you think — and you’re definitely not eating Bulletproof. Keep reading to see which foods you should get rid of — and why.

Other herbs like dried rosemary, sweet basil and oregano contain polyphenols that enhance organic acid synthesis by improving the gut flora (4). Organic acids are key to maintain bowel health and aid in nutrient absorption. These herbs destroy harmful bacteria and provide antioxidant, anti-viral and anti-fungal benefits to help you maintain a strong immune system (5).

Just wanted to say thank you! I followed this recipe and if you would’ve served me this at a restaurant I wouldn’t know the difference between this and regular cheesecake! Some minor changes I did only because of the ingredients I had available were to use coconut flour vs almond flour, stevia packs (converted) vs. erythritol for both crust and batter, and just a small amount of almond milk to get the right consistency for the crust. For anyone who may need it, for every cup of almond flour I substituted 1/4 cup (or 2 ounces weighed) of coconut flour. Along with the almond milk, I increased the amount of butter used by about 1 tbsp since coconut flour really sucks up moisture. After that, I followed everything else listed including directions and was not disappointed. Although I used an incorrect pan type(only 2inch high 9inch solid baking pan) so I wasn’t the prettiest cheesecake, it was still delicious which is honestly all I cared about. I might also add that this is the first time I’ve ever baked cheesecake (or any type of baking) of any type, so for anyone who might think it’s difficult, give it a try!
So, how do we ensure enough super-plant based nutrition on keto? Fortunately there are loads of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit you can choose from! Let’s start with low carb vegetables - specifically the green ones! The green color in plants is called chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight and turn it into energy. Chlorophyll protects the body from cancer and cleanses the liver. Amazingly, our bodies can also use chlorophyll inside our mitochondria. This is why green juices, made fresh or from powders, give us a rapid natural energy boost. Green leafy plants like Kale, Spinach and Collard Greens reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases. Make sure you eat your greens on keto! 

FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets! And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar!

This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!

×