Hi Sofia, Happy upcoming birthday to your husband! Carbs and sugar are not the same thing. All sugar is carbs but not all carbs are sugar. We care about both on low carb and keto diets, but sugar is worse. Net carbs are total carbs minus fiber and sugar alcohols. Sugar is part of those net carbs, but is listed separately because some people want to know that separately. Hope you both like the cheesecake!
Scientists are discovering that we need specific nutrition found only in plants to regulate our DNA. DNA is our genetics, but the regulation is our EPI-genetics. Basically your DNA is a template for your whole body, but it needs specific signals, from your diet, to regulate it how it works. Phyto-chemicals, found in abundance in low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit are crucial for DNA regulation. These plant based signals kick-start fertility, virility, libido, a positive mood and much more. That’s exactly what you want on keto, even more health, energy and vitality! In fact, eating enough nutritionally dense plants will prevent many of the diseases we find so commonly today. 

One of the most researched benefits, however, is how eating a high-fat diet can treat disorders such as epilepsy and Alzheimer's. There are also potential benefits for some diabetics, as ketosis can help your body regulate its blood sugar. But an overabundance of ketones can lead to diabetic ketoacidosis, so those with type 1 diabetes may choose to pursue other dietary options.
Hi! Let me start by saying THANK YOU!!! This cheesecake is beyond my expectations! I have made two so far, keeping the portions in my freezer. It is now a staple in my house. So, was going to bake this morning, but I don’t have enough erythritol to make the cake filling. Panic set in, I just went to 3 local stores (one being a health food) can’t find it. I ordered it from Amazon (great price) but it won’t be here until the end of Sept. I can’t make it that long ;-). However, i have liquid Stevia but can’t figure out how or if I can convert the 1 1/4 c of eryth. needed. Can you advice me? Thank you!!
Why Greek yogurt? Well, if you are not on an absolutely zero-carb diet and don’t mind some dairy, either, you must admit that Greek yogurt is one of the most enjoyable snacks out there. Moreover, it is supposed to be full of the good little guys that help the gut remain healthy. Other than that, it is a soft and fluffy alternative to cream cheese. While I don’t mind the cheese, I do find it can mess with me if I eat too much of it. Besides, I’ve seen people complaining they hated cream cheese pancakes and wanted an alternative. Hopefully, this recipe comes in handy for some of them.
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
Nuts are a great source of fat, and can be a great keto snack. However, it is easy to go overboard. Most nuts are calorically dense, so they can be easy to over-consume. On more than one occasion, I have found myself sitting next to the jar of nuts and “just having a few more”. Before I was aware, I had probably consumed 800 extra calories of nuts! Depending on your goals, consuming nuts in excess can hinder your progress. That’s not to say that nuts are off limits, though. Instead, portion out single servings beforehand. Avoid sitting down with the entire container. This goes for every other snack, but I feel that nuts are one of the easiest things to overeat.
We add collagen peptides to our coffee every morning because it’s beneficial for healthy joints, skin, hair, etc. If you use collagen peptides or want to add it to your diet after talking with your health care professional, we recommend Naked Nutrition Collagen Peptides Protein Powder. This product is grass-fed and pasture-raised, and is GMO free, dairy free, soy free, gluten free, and free of growth hormones.
The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.
Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Being rich in healthy oils makes these nuts particularly good for cardiovascular health [12]. Studies on macadamia oil show that it reduces inflammation and shrinks the size of fat cells [13]. This is helpful for people with obesity as inflammation and enlarged fat cells both make the disorder difficult to manage. Besides a perfect macros profile, macadamia nuts are also a good source of B vitamins, iron, manganese, and zinc.
When I first started making homemade, low-carb yogurt, it really surprised me that you can use yogurt to make yogurt! Just add some yogurt to the milk and the magic will happen! Once the yogurt is made, strain through a cloth to achieve thick, Greek-style creamy goodness that you can eat straight or serve with some fruit for a healthy and delicious breakfast.
I make my own coconut milk yogurt. Easy, bring to a boil, add plain gelatin, let cool down to add culture (I use a small tub of Coyo plain), place in a an electric yogurt maker for 12 hours. When removing from maker I add stevia to sweeten, then put in jars into the fridge. It thickens up nice, like greek yogurt. Much cheaper than the store bought Coyo.
Without too much vamping, I’ll just come clean and say that the Goods team loved the high-fat yogurts: The plain-flavored Peak tasted sumptuously round, with a sweet fattiness that made up for lack of sugar. The vanilla-flavored Peak was also delicious — a tangier, more chill cousin of panna cotta. By far, we agreed the Siggi’s Triple Cream was best. The 9 percent fat was luscious, but not so luscious that it wasn’t immediately recognizable as yogurt. We all thought the raspberry flavor would be great if it was, like, 3:30 pm and you were coming out of a doctor’s appointment and you wanted to eat something substantial that wouldn’t spoil your dinner.

The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
When we constantly consume sugar, we release dopamine in our brain – creating an addiction and an increased tolerance. Over time you will have to eat larger and larger amounts of sugar to continue the dopamine secretion. Once our body is dependent on a chemical reaction in the brain, we can find that we’re craving things even when we’re not hungry.

Hi Norma, The filling calls for confectioner’s (powdered) sweetener, and the crust can be either one, but I use regular (granulated) for the crust. If the filling is crunchy, what you have is granulated. Like you said, it still tastes good but the texture isn’t smooth if you don’t use confectioner’s. You can turn granulated into powdered by running it through a food processor for a while. Otherwise, you can buy the confectioner’s erythritol that I used here.
Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.
As any ketogenic dieter knows, the lifestyle requires a lot of diligence. Even snacking on a banana could ruin your diet. The main goal of keto is to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy, a process known as ketosis. Generally, keto dieters eat lots of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and just 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day to maintain ketosis. For context, that's about half a medium bagel.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!

The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
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