Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.
Mushrooms aren’t really a vegetable, they have a kingdom all of their own! The fungi kingdom represents over 5 million different species. Technically, mushrooms are considered to be closer to animals than plants. Edible mushrooms are rich in compounds which boost the immune system. There are loads of new varies becoming readily available in supermarkets, from button, field and shitake to oyster, reishi, and many more. They soak up flavors and add a meaty texture to dishes, they contain very little carb so can be enjoyed in abundance on keto.
Hi Reba, thank you for sharing your recipe with us! Not necessarily, peanuts are a matter of personal preference. If you can tolerate it, you can use it (I personally avoid it). I would still advice to soak and dehydrate the peanuts and then make peanut butter in a food processor rather than buying it ready-made. Franziska has been working on a post regarding health effects  of peanut butter so I will share some more tips soon 😊

Instead of making your own cereal, you can always have a low-carb alternative. Try out chia seed pudding, flax granola sprinkled into coconut or almond milk, salted caramel pork rind cereal, or just mix together toasted nuts that are crushed and crispy. It’s quite easy to find a crunchy alternative to cereal (or just a low-carb replacement in general) so keep on the lookout and experiment for yourself to see which you like best.
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
This recipe is quite straightforward and simple to follow, but the results are amazing! You have the flavor and consistency of cheesecake, but without the high carb content. You can even make it more mousse-like in the middle by beating more air into your filling ingredients, which would be a good idea for a lighter dessert after a heavier meal. This can be served without the sour cream topping if you want to.

With only 3.54 grams of carbs per 100 grams, you’re getting a solid low-carb, high protein/high fat option, perfect for your keto lifestyle. Cottage cheese is stocked with vitamins and nutrients too—calcium, phosphorous, selenium, riboflavin, potassium, zinc, B12 and B6! Because cottage cheese is overflowing with all this good stuff, the health benefits are plentiful. There’s a reason it’s in our Ultimate Keto Diet Guide Guide.
Lemons are going to help your body become better at absorbing iron which, in turn, will allow your muscles to become stronger and possibly prevent osteoporosis when you are older. Healthy bones are going to help your joints stay healthier as well. Everything is connected in your body and when you improve one thing, you are only helping something else.

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
Beware of added sugars or high-glycemic sweeteners in spice blends or condiments, but other than that, it’s fair game for keto. In spice-heavy dishes, carbs can add up, but don’t drive yourself crazy worrying about your teaspoon of turmeric. Check labels for additives like sugars, milk solids, potato starch, corn starch, or MSG, or make your own blends at home. Table salt often contains undisclosed fillers and anti-caking agents, so it’s best to opt for sea salt or Himalayan pink salt instead.
Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.
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