Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our culture right from birth and it is very hard to let go of. So is it safe to drink coffee on a ketogenic diet? Is it ideal? The answer is yes, let me explain. Most people refrain from taking coffee while on a keto diet but there is no evidence to show that it is harmful or damaging to the dietary effects of keto. However, and this is very important for even those not on keto, the effects of too much caffeine or any other stimulant are usually very volatile. Stimulants work by inhibiting the action of ‘depressant’ hormones in the body such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. However when taken regularly and in large amounts they stimulate the action of those hormones. Long term consumption and these hormones can get fatigued among other issues. At this level of high intake of caffeine – it will affect your keto adaptation. So a cup a day will not hurt your success with keto.
Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake.
Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.
Hi Kathryn, Erythritol works differently than sorbitol. Erythritol gets absorbed in the small intestine but poorly metabolized. Sorbitol does not get absorbed and passes to the large intestine where it causes stomach discomfort and gastrointestinal issues. So, most people don’t have that issue with erythritol. Monk fruit would not increase net carbs so you could use either one, but the powdered version does have erythritol in it also.
Before I let you enjoy this quick and simple (but not just “another-one-out-there”) recipe, I’d like to point out that using full-fat Greek yogurt is important. Xanthan gum, on the other hand, can be an optional ingredient, but I do recommend using it. That way you higher the chances for the fluffy pancakes to gain just the right amount of firmness.
Prior to your response, I did make a cheesecake, using your recipe for the filling (so delish, and I received all favorable comments on it). Due to the cost difference between almond and coconut flour, I did find a recipe similar to the one you shared in your response, 1/2 C melted butter (1 stick) whisked until fully blended with 2 eggs, 1/4 tsp salt and 1/2 tsp vanilla. Then slowly mix in 3/4 C sifted coconut flour. Kneaded for about a minute, adding coconut flour until not sticky. I simply then pressed crust into only the bottom portion of the springform pan, used a fork to punch multiple holes in it, then baked at 400° for 10 minutes. I let it fully cool before adding filling, then used your perfect instructions to bake the cheesecake. Love, love, love this recipe. I’m a happy Type-II Diabetic!
Pumpkin seeds are a good source of protein, fiber, B vitamins, iron, zinc, manganese, magnesium and phosphorus. They also provide plenty of riboflavin, folate, pantothenic acid, sodium and potassium. Pumpkin seeds are 50% fat with a perfect balance of PUFA and MUFAs. Their high oil content makes them perfect for oil extraction. Pumpkin seed oil has a strong flavor that goes well in salad dressings and over meats.
Smoothies can be very useful to get vitamins and antioxidants into fussy eaters, and ones like this which are packed with flavor can even help anyone recovering from illness as they are so easy to drink and taste great. This low-carb recipe uses blueberries to give a vibrant color, natural sweetness, and fabulous flavor and it can be made with frozen berries which can be sourced quite cheaply!
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
This is a great article!! I love pecans, walnuts, macadamia and Brazil nuts. Moderation is definitely the key. I don't think I could ever cut them out completely, and so glad this article backs up my thoughts about them. It's also nice to hear a good word about flax! For a few months now I've read nothing but bad about it and though I have some I've avoided using it. Now I think I will start adding it back in! Thanks for all this research!!
Fitness is my passion. Exercising and nutrition are my passion. I love sharing my knowledge with others... so that they can live happier, healthier, and more fulfilled lives. You can find me publishing on health and nutrition over at altprotein.com. If I am not exploring the peaks and valleys of NH I am off traveling abroad, learning new ideas and practicing new wellness techniques.
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