Not all nuts and seeds are created equal. Although all of them tend to be a high-fat source with low to moderate protein and carbohydrates, each contains a different nutritional profile. Additionally, each contains a unique blend of compounds, vitamins, minerals, etc. Below, I have listed a few of the nuts and seeds you may want to emphasize while on a ketogenic diet, and some that you may want to eat less often.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.
You work out for a few months and get in shape and fall back to the old habits because you were not conditioned mentally, only physically. Physical fitness is only a part of journey, fitness is over 75% percent mental. Gyms, nutritionists, and personal trainers give most people a temporary Band-Aid but never address the actual issue. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet includes secret mindset strategies to make your journey so much easier.
Hi Reba, thank you for sharing your recipe with us! Not necessarily, peanuts are a matter of personal preference. If you can tolerate it, you can use it (I personally avoid it). I would still advice to soak and dehydrate the peanuts and then make peanut butter in a food processor rather than buying it ready-made. Franziska has been working on a post regarding health effects  of peanut butter so I will share some more tips soon 😊
I'm asking because I'm on keto diet and finding how to get as much fiber as possible.If I need at least 25g of fiber/day(WHO), and for example not to exceed 50g of net carbs/day on Keto the math is easy. I can technically eat only food with max. ratio 1g fibre to 2g net carb - it means approx. half of nuts & seeds you listed. But If I multiply the fibre content by 0.3 to have just soluble fibre, I can't eat almost no nuts & seeds 😊  

It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.
Because you are using active ingredients in this recipe, it is important that you clean the equipment well before you start, but this can be done easily by soaking them in boiling water. This low-carb recipe uses live yogurt to start the culture process, and any plain one will do. Once the yogurt is ready you can serve it with berries or use it to make delicious creamy sauces.
This milk yogurt contains just 1 gram of net carbs, giving you a little wiggle room when it comes to carbohydrates. If you are craving additional sweetness, you can choose to sweeten your low carb yogurt with a keto-friendly sweetener, like stevia or monk fruit. You could also top with fresh fruit like blueberries or raspberries, avoiding high-carb fruits. Or, make a yogurt parfait with chia seeds and keto yogurt topped with homemade whipped cream, made with heavy whipping cream or coconut cream.

All grains, even whole meal (wheat, rye, oats, corn, barley, millet, bulgur, sorghum, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, sprouted grains), quinoa and white potatoes. this includes all products made from grains (pasta, bread, pizza, cookies, crackers, etc.) sugar and sweets (table sugar, HFCS, agave syrup, ice creams, cakes, sweet puddings and sugary soft-drinks).
Please note that I am not a nutritional or medical professional. I do not give out any medical advice. I only share my own experience on this blog and encourage you to consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. The nutritional information provided for my recipes is an estimate. Please calculate nutritional information on your own before relying on them. None of the recipes I post are meant to be used by any specific clinical population. The ingredients in my recipes do not affect my glucose levels or cause any allergic reactions to me. You should use my recipes and shared experience at your discretion. I expressly disclaim any and all liability of any kind with respect to any act or omission wholly or in part in reliance on anything contained on this website.
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Hi Maya! Will be trying this recipe for my husband’s birthday this weekend. I’m new to keto and my husband is supporting me with cutting out sugar as much as he can. I just have 1 question – in the nutrition facts, you mentioned net carbs 5g, fiber 1g and sugar 2g. What is the difference between net carbs and sugar? I thought the sugar count is a part of total carbs subtracting the fiber which would mean the sugar count is equal to the net carbs? Hope you can explain further! Thank you 🙂
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)

Although cashews are higher in carbs than most other nuts, they can still be enjoyed in moderation on a keto diet. They can be used in keto versions of popular dishes like cashew chicken. Also, they are great snacks. A serving is about 18 cashews, so it is especially helpful to pre-portion a serving of cashews instead of going to town on the whole container!


Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
Because some fruits have more carbs than others, knowing which to avoid is key for accelerating weight loss and reaping other possible benefits of keto. Just know that large, long-term, randomized controlled trials on the keto diet are limited, so it’s unclear whether keto is safe and effective to follow for the long haul, according to Harvard Medical School.
In order to save you time and money (from printing and shipping costs), instead of being mailed, The 3 Week Ketogenic Diet is provided to you as an instant download E-Book or e-books which you can read on your PC, Mac, iPad, iPhone, Android, Smartphone, Tablet or E-Reader. You can transfer it to as many devices as you like, and even print out pages.

However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.


Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
The name "ketogenic" comes from ketosis. At its most basic level, ketosis is the body's process of turning fat into energy. When your body's carbohydrate stores are low, you convert stored fat into ketones, which supply energy to the body. A ketogenic diet stresses the consumption of natural fats and protein—such as meat, fish, and poultry—while limiting carbohydrates. This maintains ketosis over a sustained period of time.
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
MCT stands for medium-chain triglycerides. These are unique types of saturated fats that studies show your body can easily turn into ketones [12]. MCT oil is a supplement that is a purified source of these fats. Because MCTs don't require bile and enzymes for digestion, they get easily absorbed in your small intestine and they reach the liver quickly where they're turned into ketones.
When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
Once you add in all the miscellaneous protein you get from nuts, dairy (if you eat dairy), eggs (around 18 grams per 3 eggs, so they’re comparable to meat), and other sources, it’s pretty easy to get plenty of protein with very reasonable amounts of meat. In fact, many people don’t eat more meat on keto than they ate before – they just get rid of all the junk that surrounded the meat.
This is an amazing and impressive dish to make and is full of the Indian spices we love! The chicken can be marinated overnight if you have time and you will find the flavors permeate the meat even better. This delicious low-carb recipe gives you quite a mild flavor without much heat, but if you like spicy Indian food, feel free to add in more cayenne till you get the heat you want!
The typical carb count in nuts and seeds is about 12.6 grams for every 28 grams at the highest and 3.5 grams for every 28 grams at the lowest. You’re probably thinking: that’s pretty high, but most of this carbohydrate content comes in the form of fiber, which body cannot digest. It passes through your intestines without being digested and goes into bulking up your stool for easier passage when you answer Mother Nature’s Call.
I made this because we are on a strict low carb diet and it is extremely hard to find satisfying snacks or desserts. OMG this is some good cheesecake!!! I used xylitol and tweaked the recipe just a little, I added a little more vanilla, a pinch of salt to the filling and the crust, I also added a bit of lime juice instead of lemon. We felt guilty after eating it because it just does not taste like a “diet” cheesecake. My only complaint is that it did not set completely solid so it’s a little more soft and creamy than I prefer. I think I need to adjust the temp on my oven so I can cook it longer next time. This will be my go to cheesecake recipe from now on.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
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