Rather than picking and choosing where to draw the low carb line, I included all the higher carb fruits and preparations as well for comparison, learning, and to accommodate readers with higher carbohydrate tolerances. The list is organized by net carbs, low to high by default, but you can search for something specific, sort, and organize the low carb fruit list to customize your needs in most browsers.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs. 

If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)
Juices or juice concentrate. When the fruit is juiced, most of the fiber gets stripped from the final product. This makes the net carb content of fruit juice higher than it’s pure fruit counterpart and will have a more significant impact on your blood sugar. The exception to this would be lemon/lime juice in moderation, as it’s quite low in sugar compared to other juices.
It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.

One of the best things about being on the keto diet is the emphasis on consuming good fats. In my case, that means indulging in nuts whenever I need a quick pick-me-up. However, it's important to note that not all nuts are created equal when you're on the keto diet. Since the emphasis with keto focuses on low carbs and high fats, you have to keep an eye on serving sizes as well as knowing which nuts bring the most bang for your buck as far as fats are concerned. (Say goodbye to peanuts.)

An alternative way to get your sweet fix in a keto-friendly diet is through fruit shakes or milkshakes. You can make your own shakes and use alternative, keto-friendly sweeteners or purchase premade shake mixes. The Atkins diet shakes, for instance, are low-carbohydrate, protein-rich shakes available in a variety of sweet flavors (anything from French vanilla to strawberry).
Yogurt topped with a few nuts might seem like a no-brainer keto snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you opt for flavored yogurt, like vanilla, that carb count doubles to 24 grams of carbohydrates for 6 ounces. Your best bet is to choose plain Greek yogurt, which has as little as five grams of carbohydrates for a 7 ounce serving.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets! And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar!
Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!
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That's why keto die-hards are notorious for eating plenty of bacon and cheese. However, if you're tired of eating the same bunless cheeseburger every night, there are plenty of meat-based fat sources you likely haven't tried. Get creative and make one of these five fatty cuts of meat for dinner. Of course, it's best not to go overboard and eat these for every meal–most dietitians recommend getting healthy fats from plant-based sources like nuts and avocado.
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
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