To all of those having issues with your cream cheese being lumpy. 1) Make sure your cream cheese is FULLY softened to room temperature. It’s okay to pop it in the microwave for fifteen seconds at a time to speed up the process a bit, but don’t allow it to run. 2) Having your eggs room temperature as well will also help prevent curdles in the cream cheese. Adding cold eggs to warm cream cheese without proper mixing can cause lumps. 3) A mixer (even a small hand mixer) is ideal. If unavailable, squish the cream cheese into the sugar with the bottom of a spoon, add eggs, squish again, then whisk gently until smooth.
This cheesecake tastes amazing! I made it for the first time yesterday, and the hardest part was waiting for it to cool. I did modify the recipe slightly; I only used 20 ounces (2 1/2 packs) of cream cheese just because I was mixing them one block at a time and it seemed to be plenty enough for the entire cheesecake at 2 1/2. I then used half of the batter to make the cheesecake in a pie plate and used the other half to make 24 mini crustless cheesecakes. I still used the same amount of sweetener for the filling because I like my cheesecake on the sweeter side. I loved the crust as well. I made a strawberry topping and it tasted very similar to a cheesecake biscuit with jelly. The next time I can get my hands on dairy-free cream cheese, I will make it with that. I will definitely be making this for my next family gathering. Thanks so much for the delicious recipe!
This recipe is quite straightforward and simple to follow, but the results are amazing! You have the flavor and consistency of cheesecake, but without the high carb content. You can even make it more mousse-like in the middle by beating more air into your filling ingredients, which would be a good idea for a lighter dessert after a heavier meal. This can be served without the sour cream topping if you want to.

Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.

Artichoke, asparagus, bok choy and celery are all excellent for adding crunch and texture to salads or sides. Arugula, lettuce, cucumber, watercress and other salad leaves add fresh green nutrition to your meal. Eggplant is an excellent source of a potent anti-oxidants found just under its purple skin. Roast eggplant with oil, spices and sesame seed paste is a traditional Arabian dish called baba ganoush which has a deep creamy flavor and is perfect for keto! Snow peas, peppers and okra can also be enjoyed, but in moderation. Green and above ground plants are typically very low carb vegetables high in fiber and densely nutritious!
Spurred by demands from a fat-phobic public, the ’80s saw the rise of new low-fat snacks, which tended to cover the spread with added sugar. SnackWell’s cookies, an icon of this age, filled up the cupboards of dieting aunts. These paired great with low- or nonfat milk, the combined sales of which surpassed whole milk for the first time ever in 1988. Between 1980 and 2014, sales of whole milk decreased 45 percent as sales of 2 percent and skim rose 7 percent and 9 percent, respectively.
Low in fat and high in protein, cottage cheese has long been a staple for many dieters. However, people on the keto diet may want to be careful about eating cottage cheese in abundance. A single cup of small curd cottage cheese has roughly 8 grams of carbohydrates. Although it may be good to eat alone as a filling snack, be careful about pairing it with other foods that have traces of carbs, like avocados and nuts.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
However, you have to be careful how much of these keto nuts you eat. Too much can lead to selenium toxicity which causes nausea, vomiting, and brittle hair and nails. Besides selenium, Brazil nuts can help you reach your macros because they're almost 70% fat. They contain the perfect balance of both PUFA and MUFA fats. Studies on these keto nuts show that they're especially notable as antioxidant foods, protecting against cancer [11].
I’ve been making keto “Infusion water”. One lemon, cucumber 1/2 English type, 3 celery, one inch ginger, all sliced thin. Add to glass wide mouthed jar. Pour distilled water over everything. Pour off water into glass for a refreshing drink. Add cayenne if you like it. Add more water and share with family and friends, lol. Keep adding water and refrigerate for around twenty-four hours. Start again… this fresh water should make you feel noticeably energized…pay attention to your body!
Keep an eye on your intake for nut or seed based foods, as they can be quite high in inflammatory omega 6’s. These include items like almonds, walnuts, pine nuts, sunflower oil and corn oil. Eating fatty fish and animal meat, keeping snacking to a minimum, and not over-indulging in dessert items that are dense in almond flour is usually enough to keep your omega’s at normal ranges.
Oatmeal is something we all miss when it starts to get cold outside, but it is filled with carbs. You can easily make your own oatmeal by following one of the many recipes online. Or, if you’d like a different twist on oatmeal, give our Cinnamon Roll Oatmeal a try. Using what you might think are strange ingredients (cue cauliflower), you get an absolutely delicious faux oatmeal.
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
Fruits with over 10g net carbs per 100g in weight. Depending on your carbohydrate tolerance and whether or not you are fat adapted, you may be stretching the boundaries of nutritional ketosis by eating fruit with higher carb content or more significant quantities of the low carb fruits listed. There will always be exceptions and outliers; be sure to reference the searchable low carb fruits list below to pinpoint carb counts if you are unsure.
Any of these sweeteners can help you stick with your ketogenic diet, keep your carbohydrates and sugars low and still obtain your sweet fix. Many are indigestible, which means they don't become carbohydrates at all, and your body just excretes them as waste. Just make sure that if you opt to use fruit powders like lucuma and monk fruit powder, no extra sugars have been added.
This is one area where full keto and Bulletproof differ. Except for coconut, all nuts and legumes are suspect on the Bulletproof Diet and should be limited. All expose you to high amounts of omega-6s, inflammatory oxidized fats, mold toxins, and phytates (plant anti-nutrients). Peanuts are one of the main sources of mold toxins in our diets, and often trigger allergic responses with inflammatory polyunsaturated fats, lectins and histamines. The Bulletproof Diet also excludes all soy products due to their phytoestrogen content, which messes with your hormones and may promote cancer.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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