Hi Norma, The filling calls for confectioner’s (powdered) sweetener, and the crust can be either one, but I use regular (granulated) for the crust. If the filling is crunchy, what you have is granulated. Like you said, it still tastes good but the texture isn’t smooth if you don’t use confectioner’s. You can turn granulated into powdered by running it through a food processor for a while. Otherwise, you can buy the confectioner’s erythritol that I used here.

“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
MCT stands for medium-chain triglycerides. These are unique types of saturated fats that studies show your body can easily turn into ketones [12]. MCT oil is a supplement that is a purified source of these fats. Because MCTs don't require bile and enzymes for digestion, they get easily absorbed in your small intestine and they reach the liver quickly where they're turned into ketones.
The recipe as-is is sugar-free but does not use any stevia, only erythritol. You could use stevia, but the amount would need to be different – I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use. Pure stevia is also sugar-free and does not have any calories that humans are able to absorb. But, it’s very concentrated and many stevia products contain fillers. Depending on what brand you used, other ingredients may not be sugar-free (for example, some use maltodextrin as a filler, which is actually sugar). I recommend looking at my sweetener guide for comparison, and read the ingredients label on the product you have.

I’ve made this cheesecake twice now, and it is sooooooo easy and delicious! I’ve gotten great results by just following the recipe as you wrote it. I radically changed mine and my husband’s diet after we got the news that his blood sugar was a bit too high (pre-diabetic). His blood sugar is normal when he eats according to keto principles, and it’s nice for me to be able to give him a treat once in a while that won’t spike his blood sugar. Thanks so much for this recipe!

Keto nuts and seeds, on the other hand, are rich in fat and low in carbs, having a minimal impact on blood glucose. In fact, research shows that eating these foods has an anti-diabetic effect [1]. This effect does not come solely from the high fat content of nuts and seeds. Fiber also helps as it feeds good gut bacteria which then supports normal metabolism functioning. Their high antioxidant content also helps lower inflammation in the body and inflammation is a key driver of diabetes.
Avoid meat with condiments. Because, even if you’re enjoying a 4th of July barbecue with grass-fed burgers, a dollop of ketchup might be all it takes to kick you out of ketosis. (Depending on many factors, you may need to limit your total net carbs to 25-50 grams per day to stay in ketosis.) So, enhance your meats with natural spices and herbs instead.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
Hi there, I haven’t tried this recipe with xylitol or stevia, but either one should work. For the xylitol, you can use almost the same amount as the erythritol, maybe just scant measuring cups. (Xylitol is just slightly sweeter than erythritol.) For the stevia, it will depend on the brand, because some are more concentrated than others. I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use, which include xylitol and several brands of stevia. If you use a granulated sweetener like xylitol in the filling, run it through a food processor or high-power blender for a few minutes first, to make it powdered. By the way, it’s very thoughtful of you to make this cheesecake for your husband’s birthday! 🙂
One thing to keep in mind: If it's whipped cream you're after (and not whipping cream, to add to your coffee), it might be best to, uh, whip it up yourself (one cup of the whipped stuff has under four grams of carbs and just over 43 grams of fat), since most store-bought versions have added sugar. To do that, all you need is heavy whipping cream, a hand mixer and a mixing bowl, and you whisk until the cream becomes fluffy. Add a pinch of pure vanilla extract for some flavor.
Instead of making your own cereal, you can always have a low-carb alternative. Try out chia seed pudding, flax granola sprinkled into coconut or almond milk, salted caramel pork rind cereal, or just mix together toasted nuts that are crushed and crispy. It’s quite easy to find a crunchy alternative to cereal (or just a low-carb replacement in general) so keep on the lookout and experiment for yourself to see which you like best.
Hi Dee Dee, It’s supposed to be jiggly in the middle when you take it out. It firms up as it cools and then when it chills in the fridge. I haven’t experienced cracking with it but the cause doesn’t have to do with being not done, it’s sudden temperature changes. If you want to be on the safe side you can bake it in a water bath next time. I hope you still loved the taste!
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Alternative ways to obtain your sweet fix in a healthy, keto-friendly way can be to use sweet vegetables. For example, beets, which have a wide variety of health benefits, have only 5.5 grams of sugar per 2-inch beet and 7.8 grams of carbs. Kohlrabi is another vegetable considered to be sweet and it has just 3.5 grams of sugar and 8.4 grams of carbs per cup. You can easily sweeten these vegetables even more by using keto-friendly cooking methods or use them in smoothies.
Being healthy is all about getting the right nutrients and vitamins from your food so always include variety in your diet. Have plenty of meat (or fish), dairy and veggies on a daily basis based on this low carb food list. Use coconut oil and olive oil when you cook and in your salads (respectively) and have a handful of nuts or berries from time to time.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
That's why keto die-hards are notorious for eating plenty of bacon and cheese. However, if you're tired of eating the same bunless cheeseburger every night, there are plenty of meat-based fat sources you likely haven't tried. Get creative and make one of these five fatty cuts of meat for dinner. Of course, it's best not to go overboard and eat these for every meal–most dietitians recommend getting healthy fats from plant-based sources like nuts and avocado.
Nutrition – If you eat nuts and seeds daily, you minimize your risk of nutrient deficiencies. These foods are, as already explained, nutritional powerhouses. Fat makes up a big portion of the macros in nuts, with most having over 70% of fat per measure of weight. The quality of the fats in nuts is also worth noting as most a rich in monounsaturated fatty acids [2].
Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
I just took it out of the oven, & it smells WONDERFUL. I am having one issue though. After 45 min. in the oven, it was beautifully golden on the edges, perfectly smooth on top, & a bit jiggly in the middle. I gently sat it on the cool, glass stovetop. Within 3 min, it started developing deep cracks. i assumed it wasn’t done enough, so I put it in another 10 min. The same thing happened. I’ve double checked the recipe to assure I did it correctly. I did. Any suggestions?
Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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