Thank you for your hard work on this article. I am allergic to tree nuts and on a Keto diet. I probably eat way too much peanut butter which I heard is a no no-no Keto, but eat it anyway, so probably sabotaging my weightloss.  Yes, I know peanuts are a legume and not a nut. My latest snack is peanut butter (1 cup), 1/4 cup coconut oil, 3 "baby scoops" stevia(Kal brand) , pinch salt and 3 tablespoons of ground hemp seed (because they have a pretty neutral flavor in the recipe and I believe one of the most nutritious foods on earth.) Melt all together in small saucepan and scoop into peanut butter cup shaped silicone molds or parchment lined loaf pan.
So all those great minerals I mentioned above that many nuts contain may be difficult for you to absorb. However, soaking and roasting nuts may reduce the phytic acid content in nuts dramatically. So, if you eat soaked, sprouted or roasted nuts, then this might not be a big problem for you. If you find nuts hard to digest, then this could be due to their high phytic acid content, and soaking nuts before eating them can help make nuts easier to digest and reduce your discomfort when eating them.
This strict restriction in carbohydrates means that a lot of foods need to be eliminated. Foods that are normally considered healthy, like fruits, have a high carb content — and the general rule is that the higher the number of carbohydrates the less of that food you can have on a ketogenic diet. Unfortunately, this means that many otherwise healthy, high-carb fruits, like apples and bananas, must be eliminated, eaten rarely or eaten only in very small amounts.
Hi Nanette, For this recipe I recommend a granulated sweetener in the crust and either powdered erythritol or powdered monk fruit in the filling. Pure stevia extract would be very concentrated and may change the end result. A stevia blend may work but the amount would vary depending on which one it is and what else is in it. You can check my sweetener conversion chart which can help if you look up the type you are using.
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
In general, our team struggled to eat the high-fat yogurts without at least joking about calories. A single plain Peak has 270 calories. (The same amount of whole-fat plain Chobani has 143 calories.) Peak’s macros make sense if you’re on the keto diet, but most Americans are not. For American women especially, yogurt has long been marketed as a dieter’s food — the kind of thing you eat when you want to lose weight. Even in the gender-neutral, post-Chobani era, we still think of yogurt as a healthy-ish “treat.” Are we ready to accept yogurt as an actual treat? The answer to this question will probably decide the fate of high-fat yogurts in our market.
Oleuropein has been shown to produce numerous anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-cancer, anti-viral and anti-bacterial benefits. Olive consumption increases glutathione production in the cardiovascular system and helps to prevent cancer cell growth throughout the body. (34, 33)  Olives and olive oil are great foods to eat on a ketogenic diet.  I like the pitted Kalamata olives here
I can’t figure out why this recipe calls for 32oz. of cream cheese, even if making into 12 cupcakes; I ended up with a huge amount of the “cake” part after filling the cups. I could have followed the Pina Colada cupcakes but because I didn’t plan to add the Pina Colada ingredients, I thought it best to follow this regular cheesecake recipe. Did I miss something that told me to reduce the amount of ingredients if making cupcakes? Everything still tasted great but I have a ton of product left over.
Nutrients often work synergistically in nature. For this reason, when the monounsaturated fats in avocados are paired with foods containing lycopene and beta-carotene they can actually increase the absorption of these antioxidants into the body. Monounsaturated fats also significantly decrease cholesterol and triglyceride levels (23).  Avocados are one of the amazing ketogenic foods I eat every day!
Hi Jewell, Thank you for clarifying. Sorry to hear it was bitter! I’ve never experienced that before, either. Just the opposite, people often comment that this tastes just like a “regular” (not low carb or gluten-free) cheesecake. 🙂 I’m not sure where the bitterness would come from. What sweetener did you use, and did that taste bitter to you at all? Powdered erythritol doesn’t usually have any bitterness, but stevia does tend to have a bitter aftertaste (which is stronger in some brands).

Thank you! My husband is diabetic and really LOVES dessert! Great tasting low carb desserts have been a challenge. This cheesecake is AWESOME! Creamy and luscious. And no guilt about eating dessert every evening. I had to bake it about 25 minutes more than specified. But that could have been attributed to my oven temps, the weather, beating too much, etc. Absolutely no complaints. As soon as we ate the last piece, he asked me to make another. Definitely on our repeat list of desserts.
I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.
Perhaps the only thing more divisive than politics is canola oil. People have thoughts about it. Given the research available, Bulletproof and a growing number of nutrition experts are of the opinion that you should toss your canola oil. Canola oil is extracted via a process called hexane solvent extraction. This process uses chemicals and high heat to extract the oil and process it, and the final product is high in oxidation and trans fats.[3] In studies, canola oil has been linked to lower antioxidant levels in the body[4] and lung inflammation.[5]
Being rich in healthy oils makes these nuts particularly good for cardiovascular health [12]. Studies on macadamia oil show that it reduces inflammation and shrinks the size of fat cells [13]. This is helpful for people with obesity as inflammation and enlarged fat cells both make the disorder difficult to manage. Besides a perfect macros profile, macadamia nuts are also a good source of B vitamins, iron, manganese, and zinc.
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If you’ve never heard of rhubarb, it might be time to broaden your palate. Rhubarb tastes tart, and you can enjoy it raw, roasted, or puréed in a small, low-carb smoothie or moderate portion of sauce. A ½-cup serving contains about 1.7 g of net carbs and only about 13 calories. Rhubarb also has 176 mg of potassium (3.7 percent DV), 62 international units (IU) of vitamin A (1.2 percent DV), 4.9 mg of vitamin C (8.2 percent DV), and 52 mg of calcium (5.2 percent DV). Just remember to remove the leaves before eating, as they can be toxic in large amounts.
All Content Copyright © 2018 MyKetoCoach.com Unless Otherwise Noted - All Rights Reserved. Personal Ketogenic Diet Plan and Workout.All material provided on this site is intended for informational purposes only and should not be used to replace professional medical advice. Please consult your physician before starting any diet or exercise program. Wiki link: Wiki: Ketogenic Diet
Lower-carb veggies, like cucumber, celery, asparagus, squash, and zucchini; cruciferous veggies, like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts; nightshades, like eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers; root vegetables, like onion, garlic, and radishes, and sea veggies, like nori and kombu. The guidelines are simple: focus on dark, leafy greens, then the stuff that grows above the ground, then root vegetables.

Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!


When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).
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