We are on a low carb diet but my Husband loves Cheese Cake. Since it’s just the two of us I didn’t want to make such a large pie; so I cut the recipe in half (using 2 eggs) and used a 9″ Pyrex pie pan. I cooked it at 300 for 40 mins and it turned out perfect. We do live at almost 5K feet.) The only thing I would do different is add more powdered erythritol to the filling to suit our taste (everyone is different). Every night we have a slice and my Husband keeps telling me how good it is. Using the product labels of what I have on hand I came out with 6.25 net carbs per 1/8th of my pie pan. Thank you for helping us works some good sweets into our diet! The cheat days are going to be fewer and farther between now that I have found your site.
Hi Viola, Sorry you had issues with the cheesecake. Did you use the exact same ingredients? Did you check the video? I’d be happy to help troubleshoot if you can point to where it went differently for you. As for cracking, this is likely due to either drastic temperature changes or over-baking. Check the tips in the post above. Finally, instructions for the raspberry sauce are in the recipe notes on the recipe card.
Some people believe that it's dangerous when your body enters ketosis. However, it's important to understand the difference between ketosis, which is nutritionally safe, and ketoacidosis, which is caused by a lack of insulin and can increase blood sugar significantly. The ketogenic diet keeps the body in ketosis, not ketoacidosis. It's still important to monitor your ketone levels and consult with your doctor before embarking on this diet, since ketoacidosis is a serious medical issue. 

Well, if you’ve been on the keto train for a while or just recently got your ticket punched then you know that this is a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In 2013, the European Journal of Nutrition study results showed the risk of obesity was not associated with high-fat dairy consumption (2). And a study done in 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality was not caused by increased circulation of dairy fatty acids in the body (2). Now we know that cottage cheese is not the cause of your body looking like cottage cheese or your heart turning into it.

One of the best things about being on the keto diet is the emphasis on consuming good fats. In my case, that means indulging in nuts whenever I need a quick pick-me-up. However, it's important to note that not all nuts are created equal when you're on the keto diet. Since the emphasis with keto focuses on low carbs and high fats, you have to keep an eye on serving sizes as well as knowing which nuts bring the most bang for your buck as far as fats are concerned. (Say goodbye to peanuts.)
Lemons are also keto-friendly, so go ahead and add a spritz of lemon juice to your ice water. One typical lemon wedge has about 0.5  g of net carbohydrates and only 0.2 g of sugar. The fruit also offers  3.7 mg of vitamin C, which is 6.2 percent of the DV. Lemon water contains antioxidants that fight free radicals, and it also promotes healthy digestion, according to the Cleveland Clinic.
For both keto and Bulletproof diets, opt for full-fat, grass-fed, raw, and organic dairy to reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of omega-3s and CLA. Dairy is a great source of fat on a ketogenic diet, but be mindful not over-do the protein. Although milk (yep, even raw, full-fat, or goat milk) is too high in lactose sugars, you can stay in ketosis with foods like butter, ghee, and colostrum. Avoid sweetened or low-fat dairy, evaporated or condensed milk, and buttermilk to keep your fat intake high.
Since fruits are packed with natural sugars (fructose and glucose), we have to carefully watch the amount of low carb fruit we eat each day. The best strategy to minimize fruit sugar intake is to stick with berries (notably raspberries and blackberries), avocados, olives, and tomatoes as our fruits of choice on the ketogenic diet. It is also a good idea to avoid any medium and large sized fruits as they tend to have too many sugars for ketosis.

Some people believe that it's dangerous when your body enters ketosis. However, it's important to understand the difference between ketosis, which is nutritionally safe, and ketoacidosis, which is caused by a lack of insulin and can increase blood sugar significantly. The ketogenic diet keeps the body in ketosis, not ketoacidosis. It's still important to monitor your ketone levels and consult with your doctor before embarking on this diet, since ketoacidosis is a serious medical issue.

First, it’s important to understand how keto may help you lose weight. The purpose is to kick your body into ketosis, a natural metabolic state that forces your body to burn fat rather than carbs. This happens because, on the keto diet, you’re usually taking in 50 grams (g) or fewer of carbs per day, says Deborah Malkoff-Cohen, RD, a nutritionist based in New York City. While several types of the keto diet exist, the standard approach to this plan requires you to take in about 75 percent of your calories from fat, 20 percent from protein, and 5 percent from carbs.
Nevertheless, by 1977, when the Senate convened the first Select Committee on Nutritional and Human Needs, the so-called diet-heart hypothesis had been been misconstrued as the diet-heart gospel. The first US “Dietary Guidelines for Americans,” released in 1980, recommended that all Americans eat fewer high-fat foods and substitute nonfat milk for whole milk. “By 1984,” writes La Berge, “the scientific consensus was that the low-fat diet was appropriate not only for high-risk patients, but also as a preventative measure for everyone except babies.”
Plus, many nuts are salted and may have been roasted in a tasty oil. That makes them really enticing and can lead to overeating or binging on them, which can cause weight gain as well as kick you out of nutritional ketosis. With that in mind, if you find yourself feeling out of control around nuts, you might be better off staying away from them altogether.
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