By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
Today is the 3-year anniversary of Wholesome Yum! I am so humbled and grateful every single day that I get to do this. Thank you for being here… from the bottom of my heart! So to honor the anniversary of my little low carb recipe site (that maybe isn’t so little anymore?), I wanted to share with you one of my favorite low carb recipes. It’s not a celebratory cake or low carb dessert, but it’s a part of a popular low carb dinner staple… low carb tacos using keto cheese taco shells!
DO avoid fast food. I understand sometimes it might be the only option, but if you aren’t desperate don’t eat it.  I have found it doesn’t even taste good anymore. Even though you can get bunless burgers at McDonald’s or wherever, fast food just isn’t healthy. It is full of chemicals and preservatives and they usually don’t even use real cheese and the meat often has fillers. Even the salads could have hidden sugars.
Why Greek yogurt? Well, if you are not on an absolutely zero-carb diet and don’t mind some dairy, either, you must admit that Greek yogurt is one of the most enjoyable snacks out there. Moreover, it is supposed to be full of the good little guys that help the gut remain healthy. Other than that, it is a soft and fluffy alternative to cream cheese. While I don’t mind the cheese, I do find it can mess with me if I eat too much of it. Besides, I’ve seen people complaining they hated cream cheese pancakes and wanted an alternative. Hopefully, this recipe comes in handy for some of them.
Hi Kelley, The spoon is just a regular-sized cooking utensil. Sometimes you can fit two taco shells on one – just not on top of each other, side by side only. You can also use virtually any utensils that you have with a round handle. The shells harden fairly quickly, so you can even set them on your kitchen table to harden. Taco molds or racks might also work, you’d just need something where you can place or hang them upside down.
Hi Dorothy, The ingredients don’t scale perfectly to a 6-inch pie, but can be pretty close. If you enter “10” in the box that lists the number of servings, it will convert the amounts for you. Some amounts turn out a little odd (like 1.88 eggs), so with those it should be ok to round up. The baking time will need to decrease with a smaller cheesecake, as well.
Likely the most informative “health email” that I have EVER received. So informative. Thank you for your generosity Dr. Jockers. You are an amazing doctor. I have been battling Ulcerative Colitis for 10 years and I always say that most doctors lack the most important “doctor quality” of all . . . compassion. However, Dr. Jockers, you are full of compassion. Thank you for the summit and this follow up email. I wish you peace, love and happiness.
Tea and coffee, including Bulletproof Coffee, are completely ketogenic, with bonus points for jump-starting weight loss and focusing your mental clarity. Watch out for sweeteners, fillers, or artificial flavors. While you can drink unsweetened, plant-based milk alternatives in moderation without going out of ketosis, they are not Bulletproof, and are usually loaded with toxic molds — the exception being full-fat coconut milk.[4] If you plan to include them in your diet, beware of carrageenan and BPA-lined containers.
Lower-carb veggies, like cucumber, celery, asparagus, squash, and zucchini; cruciferous veggies, like cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and Brussels sprouts; nightshades, like eggplant, tomatoes, and peppers; root vegetables, like onion, garlic, and radishes, and sea veggies, like nori and kombu. The guidelines are simple: focus on dark, leafy greens, then the stuff that grows above the ground, then root vegetables.
Tropical fruit (pineapple, mango, banana, papaya, etc.) and some high-carb fruit (tangerine, grapes, etc.) Also avoid fruit juices (yes, even 100% fresh juices!) - better to drink smoothies if any, but either way very limited. Juices are just like sugary water, but smoothies have fiber, which is at least more sating. This also includes dried fruit (dates, raisins, etc).

With only two ingredients, this low-carb dairy-free yogurt couldn’t be easier to make, so you can have a regular supply to turn into breakfast dishes or to add to sauces to make them super-creamy. This recipe gives enough about six small pots, but you can easily double the ingredients without having to adjust the timing. Serve this with a little honey and some berries for a fresh and fruity breakfast.
Because the body turns the fat into energy after its carbohydrate stores are depleted, the ketogenic diet has potential weight loss benefits. Research has shown that fats and proteins are the most satiating, while carbohydrates are the least. Because you feel full longer after eating fats and proteins, you reduce the number of calories you eat overall.

According to Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital, fruit juices and other from-concentrate products can increase your blood sugar and your calorie consumption. This means that juices are very keto unfriendly. You also want to be careful about making your own juice at home, even from vegetables. Juicing your fruits and vegetables concentrates the carbs and sugar and may be too much on your low-carb diet.
You may need to trial a few kinds of cheese to find the best one that will bake to a crispy shell, and each one will vary considerably. I used a regular block of cheese, shredded/grated it, then cooked until I knew it would be crispy when cooled down. The first ones I tried when I was developing this, I discovered I hadn’t cooked them long enough to crisp up.

Louise holds a Bachelors and Masters in Natural Sciences from Cambridge University (UK). She attended Columbia University for her JD and practiced law at Debevoise & Plimpton before co-founding Louise's Foods, Paleo Living Magazine, Nourishing Brands, & CoBionic. Louise has considerable research experience but enjoys creating products and articles that help move people just a little bit closer toward a healthy life they love. You can find her on Facebook or LinkedIn.
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