“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
I’ve made this cheesecake twice now, and it is sooooooo easy and delicious! I’ve gotten great results by just following the recipe as you wrote it. I radically changed mine and my husband’s diet after we got the news that his blood sugar was a bit too high (pre-diabetic). His blood sugar is normal when he eats according to keto principles, and it’s nice for me to be able to give him a treat once in a while that won’t spike his blood sugar. Thanks so much for this recipe!
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According to Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital, fruit juices and other from-concentrate products can increase your blood sugar and your calorie consumption. This means that juices are very keto unfriendly. You also want to be careful about making your own juice at home, even from vegetables. Juicing your fruits and vegetables concentrates the carbs and sugar and may be too much on your low-carb diet.
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
Whether you munch on them on their own or pair them with melt-in-your-mouth Havarti, Kalamata olives are one of our go-to snacks both on and off keto. Six plump olives boast just 35 calories and 130 milligrams of sodium, a low count to keep bloating at bay. Most of the fat content in olives is monounsaturated, and more specifically oleic acid, which has been linked to anti-inflammatory and heart-protective benefits.

I know a man, 69 years old, that has had multiple knee surgeries. His knees are at the point where he can’t even run. If he takes a wrong step his knee give out on him. He always had a constant pain whenever he would stand up from sitting down. After being on a keto diet for a few weeks, his pain slowly started to go away. It became less and less until eventually there was no more pain.
I had the exact same issue! I even went back and entered the ingredients manually thinking something had transferred incorrectly. I freaked out when I saw the carbs! As wonderful as it is, I think I will forgo it again until I find out what is going on. I have seen where the carbs from Swerve aren’t counted? I don’t understand that. Please explain so I can understand why! I’m struggling here. 🙁
As any ketogenic dieter knows, the lifestyle requires a lot of diligence. Even snacking on a banana could ruin your diet. The main goal of keto is to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy, a process known as ketosis. Generally, keto dieters eat lots of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and just 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day to maintain ketosis. For context, that's about half a medium bagel.
One of the best things about being on the keto diet is the emphasis on consuming good fats. In my case, that means indulging in nuts whenever I need a quick pick-me-up. However, it's important to note that not all nuts are created equal when you're on the keto diet. Since the emphasis with keto focuses on low carbs and high fats, you have to keep an eye on serving sizes as well as knowing which nuts bring the most bang for your buck as far as fats are concerned. (Say goodbye to peanuts.)
Roughly 60 to 80 percent of your diet should be comprised of fat, registered dietitian Stacey Mattinson told Everyday Health. Then, about 1 gram of protein per kilogram of body weight is allowed. To determine carb allowance, Mattinson explained that you need to determine the net carbs. This can be done by subtracting fiber from a food’s total carbohydrates.
If you’re looking for comfort food this recipe has it all.. Beefy, cheesy, casserole-y it’s everything for satisfying those comfort food cravings without out knocking you out of ketosis. Inspired by the Pioneer Woman, this keto approved recipe hits all the right notes, takes minimal time to prep and calls for simple ingredients – including…you guessed it: cottage cheese. This is one that even picky kids will devour.
Not only is this a low-carb recipe, but coconut yogurt is also vegan-friendly and can be so useful for a quick dish at breakfast time. Simply mix the two ingredients, cover the bowl and wait! It could not be easier! This yogurt can be mixed with fruit puree, topped with nuts if you can tolerate them, or flavored with vanilla. It can also be stirred into a spicy dish to reduce the heat.
Pecans are my favorite in the fall-time. I love dry roasted pecans. They are easy to roast yourself, and they make your house smell amazing. To roast, first soak the nuts in water overnight. Then, drain and place on a baking sheet in the oven at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 12-24 hours. Toss halfway and roast until the nuts are crunchy, and not soggy.
The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
Because the body turns the fat into energy after its carbohydrate stores are depleted, the ketogenic diet has potential weight loss benefits. Research has shown that fats and proteins are the most satiating, while carbohydrates are the least. Because you feel full longer after eating fats and proteins, you reduce the number of calories you eat overall.
While this particular recipe uses dairy, you can easily substitute one of the above alternatives to make your yogurt dairy-free. Simply follow the same fermentation process, combining the probiotic capsules and guar gum with your milk or heavy cream of choice. You could also choose to make your own almond milk (or other nut milk) by soaking almonds overnight and straining with a cheesecloth.
As any ketogenic dieter knows, the lifestyle requires a lot of diligence. Even snacking on a banana could ruin your diet. The main goal of keto is to use fat instead of carbohydrates for energy, a process known as ketosis. Generally, keto dieters eat lots of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and just 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day to maintain ketosis. For context, that's about half a medium bagel.
Sorry about that, Shelly! No, not at all. I just have a process where I answer more involved questions in a separate batch from general thank you’s. It just makes it easier this way for me to get through so many comments that come in each day. I really do appreciate every one and answer them as soon as I can. I did answer your other question already. Thank you so much for visiting and commenting!
Hi do you boil the heavy whipping cream 1st? I make SCD yogurt. specific carbohydrate diet.. and I add my own cultures which requires you to 1st boil the milk To kill off any bad bacterias then let it cool and add powdered enzymes then let it ferment for 24 hours so the enzymes can eat all the lactose making it lactose free. I was thinking of using whipping cream instead of milk but wasn’t sure about the boiling process?
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