The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
Nuts and seeds are low in carbohydrates and can be a wonderful addition to a ketogenic diet. You do need to be careful with your intake, as the carb count quickly adds up. Since they are such a delicious and easy snack food, it’s super easy to zone out and mindlessly eat. If you’ve ever gotten a hold of a can of Pringles, you know just what I mean. Like all the other foods, you’ll need to measure and track if you want to be successful with this way of eating.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)

Your body needs micro-nutrition and phyto-nutrition. Micro-nutrition is the vitamins and minerals found in both plants and animals, but phyto-nutrition is the special compounds found only in plants. Phyto means light, so it is the nutrition plants make from light using photosynthesis. Some of these compounds create the color or flavor of the plant. Some plants naturally have more of these special compounds than others, for example the bright yellow root, and cooking spice, turmeric contains curcumin. This phyto-nutrient has a potent anti-inflammatory effect. Some countries have already approved its use in the treatment of cancer.
Mainly for health reasons, avoid soy products apart from a few non-GMO fermented products which are known for their health benefits. Also avoid wheat gluten which may be used in low-carb foods. When you give up bread, you shouldn't eat any part of it. Beware of BPA-lined cans. If possible, use naturally BPA-free packaging like glass jars or make your own ingredients such as ghee, ketchup, coconut milk or mayonnaise. BPA has been linked to many negative health effects such as impaired thyroid function and cancer. Other additives to avoid: carrageenan (e.g. almond milk products), MSG (e.g. in some whey protein products) and sulfites (e.g. in dried fruits, gelatin).
If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
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Psyllium husk powder is what you’ll need, and you can find it on Amazon. Flaxseed Meal is another ingredient you can use to provide a slightly chewy texture. Although I feel that it’s not as good as psyllium (as it gives a slightly gelled texture), many people have used it successfully in place of psyllium. Make sure you grab a pack or 3 from Amazon. It’s super cheap and lasts a long time!

Having said that, there is no (medical) reason for which these foods should be avoided. It does make life easier if you skip them as they are sometimes hard to find - you do have to find what works best for you. If using low-carb sweeteners and bread substitutes keep most people away from sugar and starch laden foods that's great. There are some dessert recipes with no sweeteners here - I think you'll like them 😊 ketodietapp.com/Blog/Filter


Easily incorporate coconut flakes into your diet by adding them to trail mix, ketogenic desserts, smoothies, or using as an alternative to bread crumbs in coating poultry. Try this brand of coconut flakes by Lets Do Organics for coconut flakes with no added sweeteners or preservatives.  Nutiva makes a great coconut butter that they call coconut manna here

The official USDA database lists cream cheese as 1.56g of carbs per ounce. Some product labels may round this up or down, but it's actually the same for any full-fat cream cheese regardless of brand. Some calculators round this up to 2g per ounce, which can account for a big difference when extrapolating to the 32 oz needed for this low carb cheesecake recipe.
However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs.
Disclaimer- All recipes and/or projects on this website have been tested for our own individual use and/or consumption and are being provided to our readers as an idea for them to try. Use of our recipes for food, scrubs, oils, bars and other like items are at your own risk. We do not assume responsibility for any negative effects such as allergic reaction, rash, skin irritation or other occurrences. It is the reader's responsibility to read product labels and use at their own discretion. We are not medical professionals and do not provide medical advice.  Thank you.  ..................................................................................................................................................................................................This post may contain affiliate or paid links. Content selection and opinions are in no way influenced by compensation. See our full disclosure at the bottom of this page for more information. ..................................................................................................................................................................................................
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