Thank you so much for this recipe! I love yogurt & started back on Keto after falling off the wagon–I discovered that it really works for me if I’m consistent), all the store-bought yogurts were so high in sugar, even the “low-carb” ones. Kroger had the only decent low-carb yogurt, but our local one has shut down (along with many others). Went online in desperation, found your recipe, had the ingredients at hand, gave it a try–wonderful! Threw some frozen blueberries in with it–even better! I won’t go back to store-bought yogurt. This fits the bill perfectly. Thanks so much!!!!

This was my first time ever making cheesecake, so I was intimidated by the idea of making one without traditional ingredients for crust..etc. However, this recipe was extremely simple to follow and the ingredients weren’t hard to find. I followed each step to a T and my cheesecake came out perfectly! It tasted delicious and I cant wait to let everyone, (including non keto eaters) taste this perfect recipe! I’ll be saving this recipe forever!!
Implementing this lifestyle is fairly simple but can be overwhelming when you are just starting out. That is why I have created the Navigating the Ketogenic Diet Online course to guide you through the process. This program provides lifetime access to a grocery list, recipes, meal plans, and extensive e-guides filled with information to optimize your health using this dietary strategy. To find out more, click on the banner below.

Consumption of EPA and DHA in fish three times per week has been found to be a major predictor of better weight management because of improved insulin resistance (44).  Furthermore, consuming at least 2 servings of fish per week is associated with a decrease in various types of chronic disease including cancer and Alzheimer disease (45, 46).  It is also wise to use a high quality fish oil supplement to add more anti-inflammatory fish oils to your diet.


“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “

All grains, even whole meal (wheat, rye, oats, corn, barley, millet, bulgur, sorghum, rice, amaranth, buckwheat, sprouted grains), quinoa and white potatoes. this includes all products made from grains (pasta, bread, pizza, cookies, crackers, etc.) sugar and sweets (table sugar, HFCS, agave syrup, ice creams, cakes, sweet puddings and sugary soft-drinks).


Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
Unfortunately, all of these fruits are high in carbs and sugar. To put this into context, if you were to eat a whole mango, you'd be consuming more than 30 grams of sugar and 50 grams of carbs. Bananas are also high sugar and carbs — very unfortunate since they're so useful for smoothies. If you're looking for that creamy texture, you can always replace them with the keto-friendly avocado as an alternative.
The ideal keto fruit is a high-fat, low-carb fruit. The two obvious choices here are coconut and avocado. Looking at ketogenic diet plans, you'll always see fat — that's the whole point of the diet, after all. However, it's important to diversify your fats. Don't always opt for milk products; instead, try swapping your whole milk for coconut milk or trading your butter for avocado butter.
If you choose to make your sauces and gravies, you should consider investing in guar or xanthan gum. It’s a thickener that’s well known in modern cooking techniques and lends a hand to low carb by thickening otherwise watery sauces. Luckily there are many sauces to choose from that are high fat and low carb. If you’re in need of a sauce then consider making a beurre blanc, hollandaise or simply brown butter to top meats with.
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