Nuts are a great source of fat, and can be a great keto snack. However, it is easy to go overboard. Most nuts are calorically dense, so they can be easy to over-consume. On more than one occasion, I have found myself sitting next to the jar of nuts and “just having a few more”. Before I was aware, I had probably consumed 800 extra calories of nuts! Depending on your goals, consuming nuts in excess can hinder your progress. That’s not to say that nuts are off limits, though. Instead, portion out single servings beforehand. Avoid sitting down with the entire container. This goes for every other snack, but I feel that nuts are one of the easiest things to overeat.

Pecans are my favorite in the fall-time. I love dry roasted pecans. They are easy to roast yourself, and they make your house smell amazing. To roast, first soak the nuts in water overnight. Then, drain and place on a baking sheet in the oven at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 12-24 hours. Toss halfway and roast until the nuts are crunchy, and not soggy.


On your keto food list, stick to low-glycemic sweeteners to avoid spikes in blood sugar, and avoid fillers and binders such as maltodextrin and dextrose, which can spike blood sugar and contain sneaky carbs. Sugar alcohols such as maltitol or xylitol may read as no sugar on a label, but be aware that they will still cause moderate glycemic response when digested.
“Dairy products are in general inflammatory, so I recommend most people stay away from them,” Hunnes says. Cream cheese also contains the milk protein casein, which Hunnes says is potentially carcinogenic.[2] Casein tends to be inflammatory, especially if you can’t tolerate it, which could create a possible link between cancer and the milk protein.
Like all fads, it eventually passed, but not before reintroducing fat to the American diet. The post-Atkins decade saw the rise of good fats, a nonscientific subclass of fats that includes the unsaturated fats in avocado, fish, and coconut oil. More recently, the keto diet has come to reclaim even saturated fats. Adherents strive to keep their bodies in ketosis by eating a specific balance of macronutrients, or macros, made up of mostly fats, some protein, and very few carbs. To hit these macro goals, some go as far as dumping pats of grass-fed butter into their coffee.
Nuts might silently be holding you back from ketosis, so it’s important to understand which nuts are the best for a nutrient dense, gut-friendly, ketogenic diet. You might be wondering if they are okay to eat, after all, they’re tasty and high in fat. They are also widely marketed as being super healthy. But maybe you’ve heard some conflicting information about nuts and aren’t sure if they fit into the ketogenic diet and promote ketosis. Let’s set the record straight in this guide to the pros and cons of nuts on a ketogenic diet.
There are loads more above low carbohydrate vegetables you can enjoy. Typically the low carb vegetables are those which are grown above the ground. Vegetables which grow below the ground are usually energy stores for the plants so are packed with carb. You need to be very careful with below ground veg on keto, most of them are off the keto menu. Check out our recipe database for some tasty ideas to get your fill of low carb vegetables.

When consumed in moderation, the high fiber content of nuts and seeds can curb your appetite helping you to avoid excess calorie intake. The healthy fats and antioxidants in nuts is credited with providing the anti-inflammatory activities responsible for regulating lipid concentrations, preventing against depression, Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive disorders (59).

Watermelon is a staple summer fruit and another low-carb way to help satisfy your sweet tooth on keto. Each ½ cup of diced watermelon has 5.4 g of net carbs. It’s also an acceptable choice when dieting because of its high water content. The ½ cup serving size of watermelon has about 23 calories and 4.7 g of sugar. This juicy fruit also offers 432 IU of vitamin A, which is 8.6 percent of the DV.


“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “
Michelle, I second Libby’s remarks about “The fear of saturated fat is so old fashioned and outdated. Research shows saturated fat is healthy, stable and protective.”. In addition to her link, get a used copy (or new) of Nora Gedgaudas’s book Primal Body Primal Mind. Dr. Eric Berg has put out many youtube videos about Keto and intermittent fasting. Search his name with weight, or keto, or intermittent fasting, or phytic acid. They are some interesting videos.

Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).
Thank you so much for this wonderful recipe! Our 10 year old granddaughter is T1D and I wanted to make her Thanksgiving super special – and not have her feel as if she couldn’t enjoy all the deliciousness of this day!! So, my friend sent me the link for this cheesecake recipe. MY OH MY!!! It was so very good!!! We all loved it!! I also mashed up some raspberries and we had those over the top. Chloe even got to have some raspberries on hers as her BG was a little low. She devoured this cheesecake and her blood glucose numbers were not affected at all!! NO SPIKES!!
Seasonings and sauces are a tricky part of ketogenic diet foods, but people use them on a regular basis to add flavor to their meals. The easiest way to remain strict here is to avoid processed foods. There are many low carb condiments and products on the market, and there’s no way to list them all. A handful of them are great, but the majority use high glycemic index sweeteners – which you want to avoid.
Hi! I’ve tried a few of your recipes and so far I love them all! Question- I want to make this cheesecake soon but I have powdered monk fruit, would it be the same ratio as powdered erythritol? I’ve only ever used powdered monk fruit once because it was super sweet so just wondering 🙂 I looked at your chart but could not find if there was a conversion for it.
This is such a pretty dish even though it is so simple to prepare! Layers of fruit and rich and velvety yogurt give you a striped effect that could be turned into an impressive dessert at a dinner party if you serve the parfait in champagne flutes. However putting it into small jars makes it a portable Paleo snack for a lunchbox, or to take with you on a family picnic.
The keto diet has become one of the most popular recent health trends. Short for “ketogenic diet,” the keto diet is all about minimizing your carbs and upping your fats. After a few days of following this eating routine, you go into something called ketosis, or the state your body enters when it doesn’t have enough carbs for your cells to use for energy. At this point, your body starts burning fat for more energy.
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.

Nuts can be an important part of a well-formulated ketogenic diet and provide many essential micronutrients, together with having a generally very keto-friendly macronutrient profile, depending on the exact type of nuts. They will give you energy and will help you feel satiated, and can be an easy, quick and convenient snack that you can take almost anywhere with you.
Hi Nanette, For this recipe I recommend a granulated sweetener in the crust and either powdered erythritol or powdered monk fruit in the filling. Pure stevia extract would be very concentrated and may change the end result. A stevia blend may work but the amount would vary depending on which one it is and what else is in it. You can check my sweetener conversion chart which can help if you look up the type you are using.
How much is “enough protein,” and how does that translate into actual meat on your plate? U.S. dietary guidelines prescribe protein based on body weight (a minimum of 0.36 grams per pound of body weight, if you want to bust out your calculator). But that’s the minimum necessary to stay alive and prevent deficiency, not the right amount for optimal health or weight loss. The classic ketogenic diet has a ratio of 4:1 fat grams:(protein grams + carb grams), meaning that the diet would be less than 20% protein by weight (grams) and 10% protein by calories. People who want to put on muscle – or people who want to lose weight more easily – often eat closer to 30% protein by calories, which is probably fine and maybe even helpful for keto weight loss, since protein helps suppress hunger. It’s perfectly fine to eat on the low end – keto isn’t necessarily a high-protein diet – but there’s a big range of totally reasonable options.
Hi Kathryn, Erythritol works differently than sorbitol. Erythritol gets absorbed in the small intestine but poorly metabolized. Sorbitol does not get absorbed and passes to the large intestine where it causes stomach discomfort and gastrointestinal issues. So, most people don’t have that issue with erythritol. Monk fruit would not increase net carbs so you could use either one, but the powdered version does have erythritol in it also.
To make this Tasty Cheese Shelled Keto Chicken Quesadillas, your preheat oven to 400 F. Then, cover a pizza pan with Parchment Paper (NOT wax paper). Mix the Cheeses together, then evenly spread them over the parchment paper (in a circle shape). Bake the cheese shell for 5 minutes. Pour off any extra oil as soon as it comes out of the oven. Then, place the chicken over half of the cheese shell.  Add the sliced peppers, diced tomato and the chopped green onion. Fold the Cheese shell in half over the chicken and veggies. Press it firmly, then return it to the oven for another 4- 5 minutes. Serve with sour cream, salsa and guacamole. Garnish with chopped fresh basil, parsley or cilantro.
Alternative ways to obtain your sweet fix in a healthy, keto-friendly way can be to use sweet vegetables. For example, beets, which have a wide variety of health benefits, have only 5.5 grams of sugar per 2-inch beet and 7.8 grams of carbs. Kohlrabi is another vegetable considered to be sweet and it has just 3.5 grams of sugar and 8.4 grams of carbs per cup. You can easily sweeten these vegetables even more by using keto-friendly cooking methods or use them in smoothies.
Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.
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