Thanks for your question. Yes, millet and quinoa are seeds; however, they are much higher in carbs than the seeds discussed in the article. Depending on your carb tolerance and goals, you might be able to include them in your diet in small amounts. But it's my understanding that they wouldn't provide any additional benefit for gut health beyond what the lower-carb seeds and nuts do -- in fact, I'd argue that nuts and seeds would be more beneficial. Most of the carbs in millet and quinoa are digested and absorbed in the small intestine, which wouldn't have any effect on the microbiome. By contrast, most of the carbs in the seeds and nuts I recommend in the article are mainly fiber, including soluble fiber, which does promote gut health. I hope that helps! - Franziska
The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
YOU GUYS! Launching my new favorite product this week: our keto nut butter 😍🤤 _ Before I went on carnivore, I probably crushed 14 jars of this velvety smooth creation. _ This lovely jar is packed with raw macadamia nuts, cashews, coconut butter and MCT oil to get you all the healthy fats your little heart desires. _ We also are using REAL ground vanilla and sea salt in this bad boy. Check out the bottom of that jar for proof. _ EDIT: we sold out on Amazon! Head to perfectketo.com/nut-butter for more. _ Can’t wait to hear what you think! 🌰🥜🌰🥜
FULL DISCLOSURE - the original recipe does not have the added unflavored gelatin, but it set too soft for me. Also, it did not add the sweetener over the jello sweetening, but the sour cream "bite" was off-putting for me (I'm not a fan of it straight at all), so adding that little bit of sweetness took the edge off, and it is still far less sweet than my old sweets! And this works fabulously for those who can't afford other fats sources - or who just need an awesome satisfying snack with staying power that kills the sweet tooth, but without all the sugar!
And that’s how the short version above came about: based on the numbers, a good rule of thumb is to eat between 1 and 3 meals per day with meat, with other protein sources (eggs, nuts, dairy) at the meat-free meals. This will work well for most people – although, as always, everyone’s a little different and you might feel best with more or less. It’s not an exact science, and it doesn’t need to be.
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.
Oh my god, they are freaking delish. I had to bake for 20 mins instead and theyre still pretty crumbly but the best thing I’ve made on Keto. I was so sure they’d taste weird because of the almond flour but they taste seriously great. Wouldn’t be bad to have a coconut version and instead of raspberry, just use cocoa powder in either the cookie or the cream cheese.

When you have too much bad bacteria in your gut, you’ll usually suffer from uncomfortable digestive issues and other irritating symptoms such as bloating, constipation, candida overgrowth and bladder infections. To combat these unwanted side effects, rebalancing your gut bacteria levels is necessary so that you have a healthy mix of good and bad bacteria.


Hi Norma, The filling calls for confectioner’s (powdered) sweetener, and the crust can be either one, but I use regular (granulated) for the crust. If the filling is crunchy, what you have is granulated. Like you said, it still tastes good but the texture isn’t smooth if you don’t use confectioner’s. You can turn granulated into powdered by running it through a food processor for a while. Otherwise, you can buy the confectioner’s erythritol that I used here.

The keto diet has become one of the most popular recent health trends. Short for “ketogenic diet,” the keto diet is all about minimizing your carbs and upping your fats. After a few days of following this eating routine, you go into something called ketosis, or the state your body enters when it doesn’t have enough carbs for your cells to use for energy. At this point, your body starts burning fat for more energy.


So, how do we ensure enough super-plant based nutrition on keto? Fortunately there are loads of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit you can choose from! Let’s start with low carb vegetables - specifically the green ones! The green color in plants is called chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight and turn it into energy. Chlorophyll protects the body from cancer and cleanses the liver. Amazingly, our bodies can also use chlorophyll inside our mitochondria. This is why green juices, made fresh or from powders, give us a rapid natural energy boost. Green leafy plants like Kale, Spinach and Collard Greens reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases. Make sure you eat your greens on keto!

Psyllium husk powder is what you’ll need, and you can find it on Amazon. Flaxseed Meal is another ingredient you can use to provide a slightly chewy texture. Although I feel that it’s not as good as psyllium (as it gives a slightly gelled texture), many people have used it successfully in place of psyllium. Make sure you grab a pack or 3 from Amazon. It’s super cheap and lasts a long time!

Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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