The problem with some meats when you’re on Keto is that they are too lean. That means, even though it’s low in carbs, some meat has too much protein and not enough fat. That doesn’t mean you can’t have those meats. It just means you’ll need to be careful not to go over your protein macro. And if there isn’t enough fat in the meat you eat, then you will want to pick up some extra, healthy fat somewhere else.
Biggest grey area in the world of keto. Coffee is engraved in our culture right from birth and it is very hard to let go of. So is it safe to drink coffee on a ketogenic diet? Is it ideal? The answer is yes, let me explain. Most people refrain from taking coffee while on a keto diet but there is no evidence to show that it is harmful or damaging to the dietary effects of keto. However, and this is very important for even those not on keto, the effects of too much caffeine or any other stimulant are usually very volatile. Stimulants work by inhibiting the action of ‘depressant’ hormones in the body such as serotonin, dopamine and norepinephrine. However when taken regularly and in large amounts they stimulate the action of those hormones. Long term consumption and these hormones can get fatigued among other issues. At this level of high intake of caffeine – it will affect your keto adaptation. So a cup a day will not hurt your success with keto.

Not all nuts and seeds are created equal. Although all of them tend to be a high-fat source with low to moderate protein and carbohydrates, each contains a different nutritional profile. Additionally, each contains a unique blend of compounds, vitamins, minerals, etc. Below, I have listed a few of the nuts and seeds you may want to emphasize while on a ketogenic diet, and some that you may want to eat less often.

In contrast, the Atkins diet is a low-carbohydrate diet that allows you to eat more protein and carbs than the ketogenic diet, while paleo diets focus on selecting foods that were consumed before farming became popular and don't necessarily restrict your carb intake. In general, people adhering to ketogenic diets consume only between 20 and 50 grams of carbohydrates per day.
The whole point of going keto is to reach ketosis, a cult-y sounding name for the metabolic process that happens when your body uses fat instead of carbs for energy. To get there, you've gotta do the obvious: eat a whole lot of fat and little to no carbs. It's restrictive, but if you hack the the system just right, you can still create surprisingly delicious food—like taquitos and cookie dough bites. (These are our favorite keto recipes, by the way.)
Thank you SO much for the breakdown. This is an excellent list that I am going to take with me to the store from now on. I haven’t started on the diet as of yet because I was trying to put a grocery list together. This list has been one of VERY few that have the foods and the guided amount without having to pay an absurd amount of money for a list of food you can and cant eat. There weren’t any recommended amounts to eat for the meat section and wanted to know if you had any recommendations for portions. Thanks again for taking time to get wonderful information out there.
Keep in mind, however, that nuts are very calorically dense and easy to overeat. They are crunchy, tasty, and often have added salt, which makes them even more delicious. The most keto-friendly nuts are the highest in fat and also the highest in calories such as pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, etc… and because of that, they’re also the most satisfying.
If you have been struggling a bit with desserts that won’t break every rule of the keto way of life, here is the answer! Low-carb cheesecake can fill the void and let you enjoy your eating plan instead of missing out. This cheesecake is very, very rich, so you will probably find a small piece will satisfy your need for dessert. You can use toppings if you want to, but the plain vanilla taste is great as it is!

If you can’t have cheese on clean keto, at least you can have bacon? Well, sort of. Traditional bacon contains those pesky sulfites from before, along with nitrates (aka another carcinogen), Hunnes says. One recent study found a link between nitrate consumption and mania by looking at both humans and rats.[12] And nitrates are a common migraine trigger — one study found that they can actually alter our oral bacteria, which is what can set off the migraines. [13]


Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.
Thus, while nuts and seeds are great to include on a ketogenic diet, it probably would be wise to limit your portions to a serving or two (1–2 oz.) per day. An ounce of nuts is about the size of a small handful. If you want to be even more precise, a serving size is close to: 24 almonds, 18 medium cashews, 12 hazelnuts or filberts, 8 medium Brazil nuts, 12 macadamia nuts, 35 peanuts, 15 pecan halves or 14 English walnut halves.
Please note that I am not a medical or nutritional professional. I am simply recounting and sharing my own experiences on this blog. Nothing I express here should be taken as medical advice and you should consult with your doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. I provide nutritional information for my recipes simply as a courtesy to my readers. It is calculated using MacGourmet software and I remove erythritol from the final carb count and net carb count, as it does not affect my own blood glucose levels. I do my best to be as accurate as possible but you should independently calculate nutritional information on your own before relying on them. I expressly disclaim any and all liability of any kind with respect to any act or omission wholly or in part in reliance on anything contained in this website.

Most fruits are high in carbs and a natural source of sugar. This means that delicious, sweet fruits like mangoes, pomegranates, lychee, pears, kiwi, bananas and even apples may not make great choices if you're trying to stick with a ketogenic diet. Not being able to have apples on the keto diet may surprise you — after all, apples have such a good reputation for being healthy!


If your diet is high in carbs, then your body will produce plenty of glucose, which is derived from the carbohydrates and used as an energy source, and insulin, which helps to transport the glucose around your body. In this case, the body will prefer the glucose as an energy source and ignore other alternatives, such as fats. The fats will be stored in fatty tissues in your body and contribute to your weight gain.
Maca is a kind of turnip from Peru. It is nicknamed “nature’s Viagra” for its libido boosting properties. Although it contains 60% NET carbs you only need a teaspoonful to give you a sweet tasting boost. A few grams of this superfood won’t take you out of ketosis. It’s adaptogenic, meaning it will boost your body, mind and mojo in multiple ways. Aloe Vera is a species of cactus related to the lily flower. It is antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal. It heals the gut and is used to successfully reduce the effects of radiation and stabilize cancerous tumors. It is a bit slimy to eat but can be added to salads and shakes and has zero carbs. This is a superhero in the plant kingdom and its zero carb status makes it perfect for keto.

Consumption of EPA and DHA in fish three times per week has been found to be a major predictor of better weight management because of improved insulin resistance (44).  Furthermore, consuming at least 2 servings of fish per week is associated with a decrease in various types of chronic disease including cancer and Alzheimer disease (45, 46).  It is also wise to use a high quality fish oil supplement to add more anti-inflammatory fish oils to your diet.
Fitness is my passion. Exercising and nutrition are my passion. I love sharing my knowledge with others... so that they can live happier, healthier, and more fulfilled lives. You can find me publishing on health and nutrition over at altprotein.com. If I am not exploring the peaks and valleys of NH I am off traveling abroad, learning new ideas and practicing new wellness techniques.
×