One thing to keep in mind: If it's whipped cream you're after (and not whipping cream, to add to your coffee), it might be best to, uh, whip it up yourself (one cup of the whipped stuff has under four grams of carbs and just over 43 grams of fat), since most store-bought versions have added sugar. To do that, all you need is heavy whipping cream, a hand mixer and a mixing bowl, and you whisk until the cream becomes fluffy. Add a pinch of pure vanilla extract for some flavor.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
The gist of the eating plan? Taking in so few carbs sends your body into ketosis—a state of burning fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates or sugars, explains Beth Warren, RDN, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Secrets of a Kosher Girl: A 21-Day Nourishing Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great (Even If You're Not Jewish). In order to stay in ketosis, you only consume 5% to 10% of your calories from carbohydrates—which for most followers is fewer than 20 grams total per day—and instead eat moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of fat. 

Because some fruits have more carbs than others, knowing which to avoid is key for accelerating weight loss and reaping other possible benefits of keto. Just know that large, long-term, randomized controlled trials on the keto diet are limited, so it’s unclear whether keto is safe and effective to follow for the long haul, according to Harvard Medical School.
Broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts, and cauliflower fall into the cruciferous veggie category and are also must-haves in your diet. They range from three to six grams of net carbs per one cup. They’ll also come with some great benefits, such as a decreased risk of cancer and heart disease. Other great choices include celery, cucumber, and zucchini. All of these vegetables will make the perfect side dish to have with your lunch or dinner, so make sure you stock up!

This trend line extended to cultured dairy. If you, like me, were born in the ’90s, you probably grew up eating low-fat yogurts like Original Yoplait (99 percent fat-free) or low-fat Dannon Fruit on the Bottom. Even YoCrunch, that junk-food yogurt with toppings, used (and still uses) low-fat yogurt as its base. This is just to say, low-fat yogurt was yogurt; it was what people wanted when they said they wanted yogurt. What began as an unproven heart disease theory had come to embody an implicit consumer logic.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
The ideal keto fruit is a high-fat, low-carb fruit. The two obvious choices here are coconut and avocado. Looking at ketogenic diet plans, you'll always see fat — that's the whole point of the diet, after all. However, it's important to diversify your fats. Don't always opt for milk products; instead, try swapping your whole milk for coconut milk or trading your butter for avocado butter.
The best way to check for ketones and know for certain whether you are in ketsosis is by testing your blood. The Keto-MOJO Blood Ketone and Glucose Testing Meter Kit is a good way to do this. We like that it’s reliable and not too expensive. We also like that it measures blood glucose. Sometimes you want to make sure a certain food you’re eating isn’t spiking your blood glucose too much because that will knock you out of Ketosis. After you eat that food, use this to test your blood. You have your answer instantly.

Thus, while nuts and seeds are great to include on a ketogenic diet, it probably would be wise to limit your portions to a serving or two (1–2 oz.) per day. An ounce of nuts is about the size of a small handful. If you want to be even more precise, a serving size is close to: 24 almonds, 18 medium cashews, 12 hazelnuts or filberts, 8 medium Brazil nuts, 12 macadamia nuts, 35 peanuts, 15 pecan halves or 14 English walnut halves.
Typically you want to stay away from any brands that use filler ingredients like maltodextrin and dextrose, or high glycemic sweeteners like maltitol. Many low-carb products that claim low net carbs usually use these sugar alcohols. Many candies that are “sugar-free” also use these sweeteners. Avoid them where possible. These specific sweeteners respond in our body in a similar way sugar does.

If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!

Artichoke, asparagus, bok choy and celery are all excellent for adding crunch and texture to salads or sides. Arugula, lettuce, cucumber, watercress and other salad leaves add fresh green nutrition to your meal. Eggplant is an excellent source of a potent anti-oxidants found just under its purple skin. Roast eggplant with oil, spices and sesame seed paste is a traditional Arabian dish called baba ganoush which has a deep creamy flavor and is perfect for keto! Snow peas, peppers and okra can also be enjoyed, but in moderation. Green and above ground plants are typically very low carb vegetables high in fiber and densely nutritious!


Maybe you remember that some years back, cottage cheese was a staple in everyone’s low-fat diet. If you could get past the texture, you probably purchased a 6 pack and forced yourself to swallow it down mid-day because you thought it was the secret to making those love handles disappear. I’m not saying you were wrong—but you weren’t completely right.
By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”
According to Kathy McManus, director of the Department of Nutrition at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital, fruit juices and other from-concentrate products can increase your blood sugar and your calorie consumption. This means that juices are very keto unfriendly. You also want to be careful about making your own juice at home, even from vegetables. Juicing your fruits and vegetables concentrates the carbs and sugar and may be too much on your low-carb diet.
The typical carb count in nuts and seeds is about 12.6 grams for every 28 grams at the highest and 3.5 grams for every 28 grams at the lowest. You’re probably thinking: that’s pretty high, but most of this carbohydrate content comes in the form of fiber, which body cannot digest. It passes through your intestines without being digested and goes into bulking up your stool for easier passage when you answer Mother Nature’s Call.
Still iffy about certain fruits? Double check the carbohydrate counts in a nutrition database to make sure your fruit of choice is not too sugary. The carb counts can really creep up on you if you don’t track and measure. Be careful! Don’t let your sweet tooth take over your portion control or you will kick your cute little butt right out of ketosis.
We hope this list helps you figure out which meats are optimal for your daily diet planning. We are working on creating a printable version of this, so check back with us for that. We would love to hear your thoughts on this, so please leave us a comment below. If you have a favorite cut of meat that we left off this list, let us know what it is. We can add it to the calculator and see what score it gets.
Nuts should not be one of your major sources of fat in the diet. This is because they contain carbohydrates as well as phytic acid (are a pretty high in calories). Phytic acid absorbs essential dietary minerals such as magnesium which is essential for the utilization of vitamin D among many others. In moderation however, similar to cheese nuts are acceptable as part of your keto diet plan, taken as a snack, for instance. To avoid the phytic acid, you could soak or sprout your nuts but for most people on a ketogenic diet it’s not worth the effort due to the fact it a very small part of their daily intake.
There are loads more above low carbohydrate vegetables you can enjoy. Typically the low carb vegetables are those which are grown above the ground. Vegetables which grow below the ground are usually energy stores for the plants so are packed with carb. You need to be very careful with below ground veg on keto, most of them are off the keto menu. Check out our recipe database for some tasty ideas to get your fill of low carb vegetables.
Again, generally speaking, in proportion to their fat content, nuts are pretty low in carbs. Looking at the examples below, an ounce of the almonds would have about 2.9 grams of net carbs and the same amount of macadamia nuts would have 1.5 grams. It’s important to account for net carbs over total carbs, since nuts contain fiber, which is indigestible. Therefore, net carbs refer to the number that is usable by the body. Check out the Perfect Keto Guide to Net Carbs for more.

If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!

Maca is a kind of turnip from Peru. It is nicknamed “nature’s Viagra” for its libido boosting properties. Although it contains 60% NET carbs you only need a teaspoonful to give you a sweet tasting boost. A few grams of this superfood won’t take you out of ketosis. It’s adaptogenic, meaning it will boost your body, mind and mojo in multiple ways. Aloe Vera is a species of cactus related to the lily flower. It is antimicrobial, antibacterial and antifungal. It heals the gut and is used to successfully reduce the effects of radiation and stabilize cancerous tumors. It is a bit slimy to eat but can be added to salads and shakes and has zero carbs. This is a superhero in the plant kingdom and its zero carb status makes it perfect for keto.

“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley
By the 1940s, coronary heart disease was the leading cause of death in the United States. America is never a nation to roll over and die, so physicians and scientists got to work researching causes and preventive measures. That decade saw the birth of several heart health studies, like the Seven Countries Study and the Framingham Heart Study, which, as La Berge puts it, “suggested a strong correlation between diets high in saturated fats and cholesterol and increased incidence of cardiovascular disease.”

I scanned all my ingredients and also clicked on your links. My almond flour matches with the same amount of carbs but when I input everything, it has my net carbs as 4. My app may round up for some (I use Carb Manager). I think for me, the full carbs from the cream cheese is 32 oz of cream cheese at 32 net carbs (my box of cream cheese shows >1 for 1 oz) Bobs Red Mill almond flour at 2 cups for 24 net carbs and my 3 eggs show 1 carb. All together it puts it at 3.56 carbs per slice based on just those carbs. So not too far off from the 3 carbs.
Many people on the Keto diet avoid eating yogurt as it can be very high in carbohydrates, so using coconut cream can be the answer! You still get the thick and creamy consistency you are used to but without the extra carbs. The process takes a couple of days to allow for fermentation but after that, the yogurt will keep in the fridge for up to a week, so this recipe could become your weekend task!
While I see your point with regards to animal suffering (which is an ongoing issue), this doesn't have to be the case and on the contrary, people are more and more interested in meat from ethical sources. Watching a TED talk may be an eye opener but we should all do some research on human evolution. Your comment is biased because it only looks at one side of the argument (not to mention that some points are totally wrong, such as comparing human digestion to elephants??)
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
Not in the mood for cake? Brownies definitely come second on that list of delicious treats that we want once we turn to a ketogenic diet. You can easily make keto brownies that you can fully enjoy without having to fight against the craving to have more. Besides using almond flour and other mixtures of flours, you can make them out of avocado as well.
This recipe gives you one of the creamiest smoothies ever because it uses low-carb coconut yogurt and avocado. The flavor of the chocolate comes through really well, so this Keto drink would go down really well with the younger members of the family and can be a great way to get them off to a good start in the morning. The avocado adds healthy fats to the smoothie, so you will find it is filling too!

Truly amazed after trying dozens of recipes for bread, cake, etc. with almond flour and all turned to sawdust or icky, hard yuk! All the wasted expensive ingredients, I have finally hit gold with this recipe exactly as written! We have been Primal and off bread for about 4 years, but always salivating when offered fresh bread or bagel! This is a great recipe and thank you for sharing!

Best thing to do for your cheesecake not to crack. Turn off the oven just when it’s still almost slight done. turn off the heat and leave in the oven for an hour. But DO NOT open the door at all. The residual heat will cook the rest and you won’t run the risk of overcooking and it’ll cool at the same time. Then take out of the oven to cool completely and refrigerate. I love cheesecake and keto cheesecake is just as good and satisfies the cravings.


I'm asking because I'm on keto diet and finding how to get as much fiber as possible.If I need at least 25g of fiber/day(WHO), and for example not to exceed 50g of net carbs/day on Keto the math is easy. I can technically eat only food with max. ratio 1g fibre to 2g net carb - it means approx. half of nuts & seeds you listed. But If I multiply the fibre content by 0.3 to have just soluble fibre, I can't eat almost no nuts & seeds 😊
Hi Arielle, Yes, you can add more vanilla and lemon if you’d like. It should work fine as long as it’s not too much lemon juice. You could add some very finely grated lemon zest instead of more lemon juice to avoid changing the consistency. The fruit sauce with raspberries is also keto – berries can fit into keto diets in reasonable amounts. If you use a higher sugar fruit, it might not be, but with any berries it should be fine. I’m glad you liked the recipe!
Natural fat, high-fat sauces – Most of the calories on a keto diet should come from fat. You’ll likely get much of it from natural sources like meat, fish, eggs etc. But also use fat in cooking, like butter or coconut fat, and add plenty of olive oil to salads etc. You can also eat delicious high-fat sauces including Bearnaise sauce etc., or garlic butter (recipes).
Chia seeds are 40% carbohydrates, mostly is in the form of dietary fiber. Fiber is an indigestible carb that does not impact blood sugar or ketone production. It's important for normal bowel movements and gut health in general. Chia is also 30% fat, most of which is omega-3 fatty acids (65%). This makes chia seeds a great source of this essential fatty acid.
Maybe you remember that some years back, cottage cheese was a staple in everyone’s low-fat diet. If you could get past the texture, you probably purchased a 6 pack and forced yourself to swallow it down mid-day because you thought it was the secret to making those love handles disappear. I’m not saying you were wrong—but you weren’t completely right.
Keep in mind, however, that nuts are very calorically dense and easy to overeat. They are crunchy, tasty, and often have added salt, which makes them even more delicious. The most keto-friendly nuts are the highest in fat and also the highest in calories such as pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, etc… and because of that, they’re also the most satisfying.
Over the last year, the keto diet has skyrocketed in popularity, probably for one very distinct reason: it encourages you to eat fatty foods. The only major caveat is that you have to keep your carb intake low. Offsetting this often-difficult task, however, is the keto diet's allowance of another beloved food group: dairy. Most cheeses are low in carbs, making them perfectly acceptable for the keto meal plan. The same goes for fatty dairy foods like butter and heavy cream, which almost seems too good to be true. A diet that gives you the thumbs-up when you eat butter? It's not hard to see how it caught on and spread like wildfire.
Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.

We are on a low carb diet but my Husband loves Cheese Cake. Since it’s just the two of us I didn’t want to make such a large pie; so I cut the recipe in half (using 2 eggs) and used a 9″ Pyrex pie pan. I cooked it at 300 for 40 mins and it turned out perfect. We do live at almost 5K feet.) The only thing I would do different is add more powdered erythritol to the filling to suit our taste (everyone is different). Every night we have a slice and my Husband keeps telling me how good it is. Using the product labels of what I have on hand I came out with 6.25 net carbs per 1/8th of my pie pan. Thank you for helping us works some good sweets into our diet! The cheat days are going to be fewer and farther between now that I have found your site.
Hi Fariba, Yes, you’d need more of the crust for sure, probably about 25% more (multiply the amount of each ingredient in the crust by 1.25). For the filling, you could probably keep it the same to avoid messing with conversions, and the cheesecake would just be a shorter height. Some recipes use sour cream for texture or moisture, but this recipe doesn’t need it.
Hi Viola, Sorry you had issues with the cheesecake. Did you use the exact same ingredients? Did you check the video? I’d be happy to help troubleshoot if you can point to where it went differently for you. As for cracking, this is likely due to either drastic temperature changes or over-baking. Check the tips in the post above. Finally, instructions for the raspberry sauce are in the recipe notes on the recipe card.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
I know it may be challenging to follow a healthy low-carb diet, especially if you are new to it. I hope this comprehensive list of keto-friendly foods will help you make the right choices, whether your goal is to lose weight or manage a health condition such as type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, epilepsy and even cancer.
Looking for that hearty crunch that’s packed full of flavor? Look no more. Instead of cracking open a box of Ritz or Cheez-Its, go ahead and make your own! You can make crackers from anything including flaxseed meal (featured in The RULED Book), chia seeds, or even almond flour to make your own homemade crunchy snacks with a delicious flavor of your own.

Rich in gut-happy bacteria, yogurt is a great way to add a little sweetness to a Keto diet. Although you can find Greek or low carb coconut yogurts on many grocery store shelves, why not get creative and make your own? It’s easy as pie and delicious homemade yogurt will be a fabulous addition to the recipes featured on our list of top Keto-friendly yogurt dishes!


Thank you so much for the above information. Really very helpful for people like me. Just started Keto 3 weeks ago, I still get confused on my protein consumption and what vegetables have high carb content. This is by far the best “diet” I’ve been on as I feel I can go on forever and I’m not missing anything I actually eat what I want. I eat when I’m hungry and stop when I’m full, just extra cautious what I put in my body.

This recipe gives you one of the creamiest smoothies ever because it uses low-carb coconut yogurt and avocado. The flavor of the chocolate comes through really well, so this Keto drink would go down really well with the younger members of the family and can be a great way to get them off to a good start in the morning. The avocado adds healthy fats to the smoothie, so you will find it is filling too!
Thinking back about the times I kicked grains and sugar out of my life, I try to remember the very first sweet low-carb treat I got my hands dirty with. I am pretty sure it was keto pancakes. I even dare to think that keto or some kind of low-carb pancakes was the sweet “first-time” for most of us. Naturally, it is a treat that the majority of us used to enjoy relatively frequently in our high-carb times.
The gist of the eating plan? Taking in so few carbs sends your body into ketosis—a state of burning fat for energy, instead of carbohydrates or sugars, explains Beth Warren, RDN, founder of Beth Warren Nutrition and author of Secrets of a Kosher Girl: A 21-Day Nourishing Plan to Lose Weight and Feel Great (Even If You're Not Jewish). In order to stay in ketosis, you only consume 5% to 10% of your calories from carbohydrates—which for most followers is fewer than 20 grams total per day—and instead eat moderate amounts of protein and high amounts of fat.
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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