Spices have carbs in them, so make sure you are adding them to your counts. Sea salt is preferred over table salt, as it is usually mixed with powdered dextrose. Most pre-made spice mixes will have sugars added to them, so make sure you read the nutrition label beforehand to make sure you know what’s inside. If you have the choice, never include added sugar into your spice blends or food.
Herbs are great ketogenic foods that pack some of the most powerful antioxidants.  Bitter herbs like ginger, turmeric, and parsley stimulate digestive function by improving gut health. They support enzyme and bile secretion from the liver as well as the gallbladder. Consequently, food transit time increases, fats are better digested, and detoxification pathways are provided a boost. (2).
Other herbs like dried rosemary, sweet basil and oregano contain polyphenols that enhance organic acid synthesis by improving the gut flora (4). Organic acids are key to maintain bowel health and aid in nutrient absorption. These herbs destroy harmful bacteria and provide antioxidant, anti-viral and anti-fungal benefits to help you maintain a strong immune system (5).

Animal proteins (meat, fish, etc.) have very little, if any, carbs. You can consume them in moderate amounts as needed to control hunger. Overall, choose fattier cuts of meat rather than leaner ones. For example, chicken thighs and legs are preferable to chicken breasts because they contain much more fat. We’ve got quick keto diet chicken recipes to help.

Hi Justin, I’m glad you liked the cheesecake! This definitely doesn’t have 18g net carbs per slice – you can see that even at a glance since all the ingredients are very low carb (almond flour, cream cheese, eggs, erythritol, etc.) The nutrition label included below the recipe card shows the nutrition breakdown per slice. In MyFitnessPal, did you set the number of servings for the recipe to 16? If it was set to something else, that could be one reason for the number to be significantly off like that.
Along with nuts being extremely easy to consume in excess, they also have a high omega-6 content. Read my article about comparing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios to find out why we want a balanced ratio. In summary, the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is 1:4, but the average ratio is 1:20! An easy way to balance the ratio is to eliminate major sources of Omega-6 fatty acids from your diet. This could mean lowering nut consumption. Balancing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is important for preventing inflammation, promoting proper nervous system function, and improving overall health. The omega-3 and omega-6 contents of nuts is represented in the following graph.
“The problem with the stated carbohydrate content on the packages of fermented food products arises because the government makes manufacturers count the carbohydrates of food “by difference.” That means they measure everything else including water and ash and fats and proteins. Then “by difference,” they assume everything else is carbohydrate. This works quite well for most foods including milk. However, to make yogurt, buttermilk and kefir, the milk is inoculated with the lactic acid bacteria. These bacteria use up almost all the milk sugar called “lactose” and convert it into lactic acid. It is this lactic acid which curds the milk and gives the taste to the product. Since these bacteria have “eaten” most of the milk sugar by the time you buy it (or make it yourself.) At the time you eat it, how can there be much carbohydrate left? It is the lactic acid which is counted as carbohydrate. Therefore, you can eat up to a half cup of plain yogurt, buttermilk, or kefir and only count 2 grams of carbohydrates (Dr. Goldberg has measured this in his own laboratory.) One cup will contain about 4 grams of carbohydrates. Daily consumption colonizes the intestine with these bacteria to handle small amounts of lactose in yogurt (or even sugar-free ice cream later.) “

If, on the other hand, you lower the amount of carbs in your diet and increase the amount of fats, your body will go into a state known as ketosis. This is the source of the name 'ketogenic' in 'ketogenic diet’. In this state, your liver will break fats in your diet down and produce ketones, an energy source. Your body would pretty much rather use glucose as a primary source of energy but, when forced to look for an alternative, it will resort to burning fat instead.
The beauty of The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet is that it's completely opposite of the majority of "lose-weight quick" weight loss scams. The 3-Week Ketogenic Diet focuses on FAT LOSS, not weight loss (the difference is explained in the Program Guide). You'll be eating anti-inflammatory foods that promote a healthy, a fast metabolism, and stimulates fat-burning hormones. You'll lose a lot of weight and inches in a short period of time and this time...you'll keep it off.
Some people group tomatoes with vegetables, but a tomato is actually a fruit. Low in fat but also carbs (with just 2.4 g of net carbs per ½ cup), tomatoes are also keto-friendly. The same serving size of tomatoes contains 2.4 g of sugar and 16 calories. Among their health benefits, tomatoes contain lycopene, which research suggests may help prevent heart disease.

Nutritionists, including the Good Housekeeping Institute's own Jaclyn London, MS, RD, CDN, remain more skeptical. The diet's aim of inducing ketosis — a metabolic process where the body uses fat instead of carbs for energy — can backfire because this plan takes a lot of willpower. Plus, any weight you may lose while on it can return when you stop. RDs and other experts like U.S. News and World Report agree that Mediterranean-style eating plans have more research behind them and produce better, more long-lasting results.
While Yoplait is known for its dessert-flavored yogurts—a high-sugar snack that doesn’t make the cut while on keto—its newest addition tops our nutritional charts. Unlike other dairy yogurts, YQ by Yoplait drastically reduces its carb count by ultra-filtering the milk. This removes 99 percent of the lactose (a type of sugar), so you still get gut-loving probiotics with almost zero carbs.
Thank you, Ariana! Are you referring to concentrated pure monk fruit powder, OR powdered monk fruit blend (which has monk fruit and erythritol in the ingredients)? If it’s concentrated powder, it can vary due to the concentration but would be a lot less. If it’s a blend, the amount would be similar but just a little less – just use scant measuring cups.

I use Swerve powder and Pyure Blend. When you say you can use any sweetener you want, are the measurements 1:1 with your listed sweeteners. I’ve checked the Sweetener conversion chart you’ve provided and if you call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol, there is no conversion for Pyure, and a lot of your recipies call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol. I just want to make sure I do accurate measurements.


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Hi Stephanie, Unfortunately coconut flour doesn’t work as a 1:1 replacement for almond flour, due to it’s moisture absorbing properties. So, you’d need a different crust if you want to use coconut flour. You could use the crust from my pina colada cheesecake cupcakes instead – just follow the instructions from that recipe for the crust, but press into the springform pan instead of cupcake liners. From there you can follow this regular cheesecake recipe the same way as written. Hope that helps!

Time to address the elephant in the room. Rhubarb is not a fruit. Or at least, rhubarb fails the eye test at first glance. It looks like red celery. When raw, it feels like celery. Hard, bitter, fibrous, and about as enjoyable as a spoonful of cough syrup. Except, that’s not rhubarb at all. Rhubarb measures like a vegetable but tastes like a fruit. It cooks like a fruit and fits the sweet profile you may be craving on a Tuesday night. Reduce 4 ounces of chopped rhubarb with 4 ounces of strawberries, and you have sweet fruit topping that barely skims 9 grams of net carbs, or roughly 4.5 net carbs per serving.
This is such a pretty dish that you could serve it for breakfast or as a dessert after a family meal. The layers of chia, fruit and creamy yogurt are just crying out for you to tuck in! You can also change the fruits for added color if you like – blueberries are great in this recipe. When you reach the chia seed layer you will get a wonderful hit from the ginger and cinnamon, setting off the flavor of the fruit.

Where does nutrition info come from? Nutrition facts are provided as a courtesy, sourced from the USDA Food Database. You can find individual ingredient carb counts we use in the Low Carb & Keto Food List. Carb count excludes sugar alcohols. Net carb count excludes both fiber and sugar alcohols, because these do not affect blood sugar in most people. We try to be accurate, but feel free to make your own calculations.
So I only had 24 oz of cream cheese, but I decided to wing it. My 9 in cheesecake pan is silicone and not very deep. After mixing everything ( did everything else by recipe, just less cream cheese) I had too much filling, so I also filled 5 silicone cupcake liners and baked it in a water bath on the lower rack. At 35 minutes the large cake was starting to brown but the small ones were still white, but seemed pretty solid, so I took them out and cooled them. Then at 45 minutes, the big cake seemed almost too brown, so I pulled it out. A couple hours in the fridge and the small ones( with no crust) popped out of the silicone liners and were super delicious. The big one came away from the sides cleanly and it would have been ready to eat already, but we already ate the little ones, so tomorrow we will see how yummy the cake is with crust. Yay for cheesecake!
Before I let you enjoy this quick and simple (but not just “another-one-out-there”) recipe, I’d like to point out that using full-fat Greek yogurt is important. Xanthan gum, on the other hand, can be an optional ingredient, but I do recommend using it. That way you higher the chances for the fluffy pancakes to gain just the right amount of firmness.
I use Swerve powder and Pyure Blend. When you say you can use any sweetener you want, are the measurements 1:1 with your listed sweeteners. I’ve checked the Sweetener conversion chart you’ve provided and if you call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol, there is no conversion for Pyure, and a lot of your recipies call for 1/4 cup of Erythritol. I just want to make sure I do accurate measurements.
This Cheesy Gluten Free & Keto Chicken Quesadilla Recipe can be Made in Under 20 Minutes!!! It’s Incredibly Easy to Make and Tastes Just Like a Traditional Mexican Style Quesadilla. The Low Carb and Keto Cheese Shell is a Perfect Fit for this Classic. You’ll Wonder Why you Haven’t Tried This Sooner! It Makes an Awesome On The Go Lunch or an Easy to Throw Together Dinner. It Would also Be Great for Parties Because it Can be Made Ahead an Reheated in Just a Few Minutes.
There are plenty of keto fruit options out there that are high in fiber and low in net carbs, making them an ideal addition to a well-rounded ketogenic diet. In fact, adding a few low-carb fruits to your daily diet can help satisfy your sweet tooth while also supplying a steady stream of the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants that your body needs.

Having said that, there is no (medical) reason for which these foods should be avoided. It does make life easier if you skip them as they are sometimes hard to find - you do have to find what works best for you. If using low-carb sweeteners and bread substitutes keep most people away from sugar and starch laden foods that's great. There are some dessert recipes with no sweeteners here - I think you'll like them 😊 ketodietapp.com/Blog/Filter

Rami co-founded Tasteaholics with Vicky at the start of 2015 to master the art of creating extremely delicious food while researching the truth behind nutrition, dieting and overall health. You can usually find him marketing, coding or coming up with the next crazy idea because he can't sit still for too long. His top read is The 4-Hour Workweek and he loves listening to Infected Mushroom in his spare time.
It’s the same question again and again. Keto is so different than the Standard American Diet, just figuring out what to eat really trips people up. For those first getting started, it can be a little tricky identifying which foods are keto and which ones to avoid. If you’re struggling to figure out what you can and can’t eat, this guide will give you a great starting point to determine which foods are keto friendly! All foods listed here are low in carbohydrates and can easily be incorporated into a ketogenic diet. Think of these as your go-to foods!
Up until the 1940s, Americans ate a pretty high-fat diet. According to food historian Ann F. La Berge, most Americans in the North ate “meat stews, creamed tuna, meat loaf, corned beef and cabbage, [and] mashed potatoes with butter.” Americans in the South preferred (similarly high-fat) “ham hocks, fried chicken, country ham, [and] biscuits and cornbread with butter or gravy.”
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).
•  Humans unlike true carnivores do not have fangs to tear the flesh while the prey is walking.  We need to marinate it to tenderize and so on which basically indicates we are not carnivore and that eating meat is an acquired taste.  Humans are infatuated with the taste of meat and for long time now we have believed that eating meat is legitimate, a mistake with horrible consequences for animals and us.
You can receive the FULL benefit of the 3-Week Ketogenic Diet without adding any exercise during the 3-weeks you'll be following the plan. If you choose to incorporate at least an hour of metabolic exercise during the week using my personal-trainer guided exercise videos, you'll see up to THREE times the results. Exercise contributes to hormonal balance, blood sugar stability, and lean muscle growth.
Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
Although excellent sources of fat, nuts add up quickly in protein and carbs, and are often inflammatory. Snack on fattier nuts such as macadamia nuts and pecans, but limit those high in inflammatory omega-6s, like peanuts and sunflower seeds. Only use nut flours (almond, coconut) in moderation, as they are packed with protein. To stay in ketosis, limit high-carb nuts like cashews, pistachios and chestnuts, and avoid most beans.
Yogurt topped with a few nuts might seem like a no-brainer keto snack, but a 5.3 ounce serving of plain yogurt has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you opt for flavored yogurt, like vanilla, that carb count doubles to 24 grams of carbohydrates for 6 ounces. Your best bet is to choose plain Greek yogurt, which has as little as five grams of carbohydrates for a 7 ounce serving.

Frozen yogurt has become really popular as a snack or a dessert, but most of the time it can be high in carbs, so let’s see if we can’t sort that! This wonderfully easy sugar-free recipe gives you a really impressive dish that would even impress at a dinner party. Using the chia seeds adds texture and bulk to the dish and also helps it go a bit further.
Not in the mood for cake? Brownies definitely come second on that list of delicious treats that we want once we turn to a ketogenic diet. You can easily make keto brownies that you can fully enjoy without having to fight against the craving to have more. Besides using almond flour and other mixtures of flours, you can make them out of avocado as well.

The ketogenic diet is super popular these days, but following it can be challenging. The plan requires a lot of diligence, as eating too many carbohydrates can knock you out of fat-burning mode, also known as ketosis. Keto dieters eat large amounts of fat, a moderate amount of protein, and only 20-30 grams of carbohydrates per day—or about half a medium bagel—to maintain ketosis.
For those looking for something just a little closer to real sugar, you can use Xylitol. It cooks and tastes very similar to sugar, but it has a slight glycemic impact (13 vs. 100 for sugar). It is great, but please keep in mind that it is very toxic to animals and it will raise insulin levels slightly. These are the two most cited reasons for not using Xylitol.

Hi Nanette, For this recipe I recommend a granulated sweetener in the crust and either powdered erythritol or powdered monk fruit in the filling. Pure stevia extract would be very concentrated and may change the end result. A stevia blend may work but the amount would vary depending on which one it is and what else is in it. You can check my sweetener conversion chart which can help if you look up the type you are using.
However, as easy as this may sound, the key to keeping your body in ketosis is to constantly pack your meals with fatty eats and stay as far away from carbs as you possibly can, which can get quite demanding—especially if you’re not prepared. To help you maintain this ethereal fat-burning state, we’ve rounded up 14 snacks you can grab on-the-go. These eats will keep you satiated with healthy fats and boast no more than five grams of net carbs. 

If you have a cow’s milk intolerance, you might find goat’s milk can be a good replacement as it is much easier to digest and won’t upset your system. This is a great recipe if you fancy trying goat’s milk yogurt and it can be used in all the ways you would use other yogurts. You will find that this one is rather thin, so if you like your yogurt thicker, strain the mixture through a cloth and the result will be much better.

Vitamin C is an important water-soluble vitamin we need for the biosynthesis of collagen, certain proteins, and neurotransmitters. Your brain also heavily relies on vitamin C for antioxidant defense. Adults generally need around 75-120 mg of vitamin C daily to maintain these functions [3]. The problem with vitamin C is that it degrades when exposed to heat and light, so unlike fruit, cooked vegetables are not the best source of this nutrient.


For those looking for something just a little closer to real sugar, you can use Xylitol. It cooks and tastes very similar to sugar, but it has a slight glycemic impact (13 vs. 100 for sugar). It is great, but please keep in mind that it is very toxic to animals and it will raise insulin levels slightly. These are the two most cited reasons for not using Xylitol.
One thing to keep in mind: If it's whipped cream you're after (and not whipping cream, to add to your coffee), it might be best to, uh, whip it up yourself (one cup of the whipped stuff has under four grams of carbs and just over 43 grams of fat), since most store-bought versions have added sugar. To do that, all you need is heavy whipping cream, a hand mixer and a mixing bowl, and you whisk until the cream becomes fluffy. Add a pinch of pure vanilla extract for some flavor.
So I only had 24 oz of cream cheese, but I decided to wing it. My 9 in cheesecake pan is silicone and not very deep. After mixing everything ( did everything else by recipe, just less cream cheese) I had too much filling, so I also filled 5 silicone cupcake liners and baked it in a water bath on the lower rack. At 35 minutes the large cake was starting to brown but the small ones were still white, but seemed pretty solid, so I took them out and cooled them. Then at 45 minutes, the big cake seemed almost too brown, so I pulled it out. A couple hours in the fridge and the small ones( with no crust) popped out of the silicone liners and were super delicious. The big one came away from the sides cleanly and it would have been ready to eat already, but we already ate the little ones, so tomorrow we will see how yummy the cake is with crust. Yay for cheesecake!
But if your friends have gone #keto and you're curious about what that exactly entails, the basic premise is fairly simple. The diet focuses on eating mostly fat, limited amounts of protein, and almost no carbs at all. The "do" list includes: meat, seafood, eggs, vegetables that grow above ground, nuts and seeds, fats and oils, and some dairy products. In terms of drinks, most keto diet guides advise people to stick to water and skip diet soda, even though it's artificially sweetened. (No Diet Coke — sorry!)
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