Despite its bad reputation, consuming the egg yolk is a key part of receiving all the great health benefits eggs have to offer.  The egg yolk is concentrated with essential nutrients like folate, B12, zinc and choline.  It is also rich in the fat burning compound conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) and the powerful and hard to get fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K2.

So, how do we ensure enough super-plant based nutrition on keto? Fortunately there are loads of low carb vegetables and keto friendly fruit you can choose from! Let’s start with low carb vegetables - specifically the green ones! The green color in plants is called chlorophyll. Plants use chlorophyll to capture sunlight and turn it into energy. Chlorophyll protects the body from cancer and cleanses the liver. Amazingly, our bodies can also use chlorophyll inside our mitochondria. This is why green juices, made fresh or from powders, give us a rapid natural energy boost. Green leafy plants like Kale, Spinach and Collard Greens reduce the risk of cancer and many other diseases. Make sure you eat your greens on keto!
Keeping you trim. The fats found in cottage cheese will set your body to fat burning mode. A high fat diet will help put your body into ketosis meaning that your body will use fat for energy instead of glycogen and carbs (1). A ketogenic diet has been indicated to make a positive difference in weight loss and cardiovascular health among other diseases including epilepsy (3).
Along with nuts being extremely easy to consume in excess, they also have a high omega-6 content. Read my article about comparing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios to find out why we want a balanced ratio. In summary, the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is 1:4, but the average ratio is 1:20! An easy way to balance the ratio is to eliminate major sources of Omega-6 fatty acids from your diet. This could mean lowering nut consumption. Balancing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is important for preventing inflammation, promoting proper nervous system function, and improving overall health. The omega-3 and omega-6 contents of nuts is represented in the following graph.
In America, most full-fat yogurts have 4 to 5 percent fat. (Think of your standard full-fat Fage.) Liberté Méditerranée has almost twice as much, an increase in fat so flagrantly lush that you might as well call it fridge-temperature ice cream. For years, I searched for an American equivalent, which actually took much longer than expected. Decades of dubious low-fat trends have pushed dairy fat to the margins of our culture. It was only last year, with the ascendancy of keto — a trendy high-fat, low carb diet — that high-fat yogurts debuted on our shelves as something between a health food product and a treat.
However, the need to eliminate carbohydrate-rich foods does not mean that all fruits must be removed from your daily diet. In fact, several high-fat, low-carb fruits, like coconut and avocado, are staples of the ketogenic diet. Ultimately, finding good keto fruits just involves identifying fruits with low carb content, so that you can consume healthy, sweet foods without affecting ketosis.

As mentioned earlier, the keto diet takes carbs intake into consideration. And if you look at carbs found in yogurt, you will find that yogurt, of many types, have lots of carbs. Strawberry yogurt, for instance, has around 33 grams of carbs, which is more than recommended 20g of carbs per meal to be in shape – and less than 20g per meal to lose weight.
If you’re one of the lucky people that have a dehydrator, you can take serious advantage of it by dehydrating thin slices of vegetables overnight (normally 12 hours) to get crisp, perfect vegetables that you can eat as snacks. Do this with zucchini, radish, or jicama. If you’re not lucky enough to have a dehydrator (like me), then you can easily make cheese chips in the oven and flavor them with your own spices!
On the other hand, the types of foods you’ll avoid eating on the keto, low-carb food plan are likely the same ones you are, or previously were, accustomed to getting lots of your daily calories from before starting this way of eating. This includes items like fruit, processed foods or drinks high in sugar, those made with any grains or white/wheat flour, conventional dairy products, desserts, and many other high-carb foods (especially those that are sources of “empty calories”).
The recipe as-is is sugar-free but does not use any stevia, only erythritol. You could use stevia, but the amount would need to be different – I have a sweetener conversion chart here that you can use. Pure stevia is also sugar-free and does not have any calories that humans are able to absorb. But, it’s very concentrated and many stevia products contain fillers. Depending on what brand you used, other ingredients may not be sugar-free (for example, some use maltodextrin as a filler, which is actually sugar). I recommend looking at my sweetener guide for comparison, and read the ingredients label on the product you have.
One of the foods that people must completely eliminate while adhering to ketogenic diets is fruit juice. This is because fruit juices are a concentrated source of carbohydrates and sugar, and some may have added sugars. If you think there's already a lot of sugar in that mango or apple, don't even consider going near most commercially produced juices.

Beware of added sugars or high-glycemic sweeteners in spice blends or condiments, but other than that, it’s fair game for keto. In spice-heavy dishes, carbs can add up, but don’t drive yourself crazy worrying about your teaspoon of turmeric. Check labels for additives like sugars, milk solids, potato starch, corn starch, or MSG, or make your own blends at home. Table salt often contains undisclosed fillers and anti-caking agents, so it’s best to opt for sea salt or Himalayan pink salt instead.
If you like smoothies but don’t fancy the banana-based ones as they can contain extra sugars, then a coconut yogurt-based one can solve the problem! With the natural sweetness of the berries, this drink makes a fresh and fruity start to the day or a lovely refreshing Paleo-friendly snack. This recipe could also be used to make a frozen yogurt dessert!
Legit Halleluj! Made this perfect my 1st attempt & every multiple times following. Also my 1st attempt ever at cheesecake. I think I made it 6 times during recent holidays. Helped me stay on keto during that time!!! Though I still hope to one day find a lower to zero carb cream cheese. One time I swapped cream cheese for Neufchatel cheese as it has fewer carbs (& less fat) but tasted nearly identical. Also, I sub crust to all pecan instead (just ground up raw pecans, butter & erythritol), I’ll have to try to remake one time with your almond crust, if we can pry away from the pecan! **Thank you for your fabulous recipe!!** (I use organic & grass-fed ingredients whenever I can, so it’s always such a bummer when a new recipe doesn’t knock outta the park. But this one does.)
Nuts are commonly used in baking ketogenic desserts. For example, almond flour and coconut flour are often used as a substitute for regular flour in baked goods. If you are using nut flour to replace regular flour, make sure you know the correct substitution ratio. Most ketogenic recipes will take care of the conversions for you, but if you are experimenting and trying to create a keto version of a high carb recipe, keep these conversion tips in mind.
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
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