This is my own personal alternative, though I've recently fallen back in love with Greek yogurt again (normally the texture and waxy coating it leaves in my mouth are very off-putting...). Looking at this now, I could easily see adding an unflavored/flavored protein powder and/or collagen to make this have more of a protein content. You might even mix pureed cottage cheese with the sour cream. I'm not sure what that would do for texture... Possibilities are endless, really, once you master the initial recipe.
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“I really believe that the more informed you are about the benefits of a healthy bite versus the chain reaction that you’re going to put into effect in your body when you take that bite — you just suddenly don’t want to make that choice for yourself anymore. It’s beyond willpower at that point; it’s become a desire to do something good for yourself.” — Christie Brinkley
This is delicious, but I am very confused by the macros. What sour cream are you using? I use full-fat (14%) sour cream, and it also has 2 carbs, but that’s per 2 tablespoon serving! That means 1/2 cup would be 8 carbs, and 180 calories just for the sour cream alone. I can’t imagine what kind of sour cream you have that would be only 1/4 of those numbers…can you please share? Thanks!
If you were drawn to the ketogenic diet because you were promised copious amounts of cheese,  no one would blame you. Cheese is delicious. However, “I’m on keto” does not mean you have carte blanche to eat three mozzarella cheese sticks plus a couple bites of cheddar followed by some shredded cheese eaten out of the bag in front of your fridge at midnight. It’s easy to fall into the trap of foods that are technically keto, but not good for optimizing your overall health. Like the aforementioned cheese. (And if you’re following the Bulletproof Diet or just want to feel like the most kickass version of yourself, it’s highly recommended to avoid cheese — more on that shortly.)

Along with nuts being extremely easy to consume in excess, they also have a high omega-6 content. Read my article about comparing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios to find out why we want a balanced ratio. In summary, the ideal omega-3 to omega-6 ratio is 1:4, but the average ratio is 1:20! An easy way to balance the ratio is to eliminate major sources of Omega-6 fatty acids from your diet. This could mean lowering nut consumption. Balancing omega-3 to omega-6 ratios is important for preventing inflammation, promoting proper nervous system function, and improving overall health. The omega-3 and omega-6 contents of nuts is represented in the following graph.
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The ideal keto fruit is a high-fat, low-carb fruit. The two obvious choices here are coconut and avocado. Looking at ketogenic diet plans, you'll always see fat — that's the whole point of the diet, after all. However, it's important to diversify your fats. Don't always opt for milk products; instead, try swapping your whole milk for coconut milk or trading your butter for avocado butter.
However, most nuts also contain antioxidants that protect against linoleic acid oxidation, so considering the small amount of nuts most people eat, this is probably not a huge problem for you to worry about. And if you are worried, then dehydrating soaked nuts at low temperatures can be useful in reducing the possibility of PUFA damage along with the levels of phytic acids in nuts.

It starts with limiting carbohydrate intake to just 20–30 net grams per day. “Net carbs” describes the amount of carbs remaining once dietary fiber is taken into account. Because fiber is indigestible once consumed, simply don’t count grams of fiber toward their daily carb allotment. So that means subtracting grams of fiber from total carb games, to give you the total net carbs.
Potential Health Benefits: Improvements in lipid profile. In one study, people with mildly elevated cholesterol consumed 30 grams (1 ounce) of hazelnuts for 4 weeks. By the end of the study, they had significant reductions in total cholesterol and cholesterol: HDL ratio. In addition, they experienced a significant decrease in apo-B, reflecting a reduction in their LDL particle number (16).
Certain types of dairy can be enjoyed on the keto diet! Butter, cheese, full fat yogurts and heavy cream – this is not your typical diet fare! When eating dairy, you will generally want to choose ingredients that have a lower amount of lactose. Lactose is a sugar that will spike your blood sugar. You will want to stay away from milk, as it is full of lactose (aka sugar)! And of course, if you have lactose intolerance you should avoid dairy altogether.

Yes, they're technically a fruit, but we think olives deserve a shout-out all of their own, since they're also a great source of healthy fats and are one of a few keto-approved packaged foods. Plus, they're a great source of antioxidants, will satisfy your craving for something salty, and are blissfully low-carb. “About a palm's worth only has 3 grams of net carbs,” Sarah Jadin, RD, told Health in a previous interview.


Nuts and seeds are low in carbohydrates and can be a wonderful addition to a ketogenic diet. You do need to be careful with your intake, as the carb count quickly adds up. Since they are such a delicious and easy snack food, it’s super easy to zone out and mindlessly eat. If you’ve ever gotten a hold of a can of Pringles, you know just what I mean. Like all the other foods, you’ll need to measure and track if you want to be successful with this way of eating.

Danyiel, Your daily macronutrient needs (for calories, protein, fat, and carbs) vary person to person, and also based on what your fitness goals are (for example, weight loss, maintenance, etc.). There are calculators that help you determine your specific macro levels; you might find our macro calculator review post helpful: https://theketoqueens.com/keto-macro-calculator-review/ Please let us know if you have other questions; good luck on your keto journey!
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