Strawberries and currants have fairly high sugar content in the 7 to 9 gram-per-cup serving range. Cranberries and raspberries, on the other hand, only have between 4.5 and 5.5 grams. You should be aware that it's not just about sugar, though — the total carbs in raspberries come out to 14.7 grams per serving, while cranberries have 13.4 grams per serving. Despite this, it's easy to have half a serving of any of these berries as part of a dessert or morning smoothie and still be within keto diet parameters.
For those looking for something just a little closer to real sugar, you can use Xylitol. It cooks and tastes very similar to sugar, but it has a slight glycemic impact (13 vs. 100 for sugar). It is great, but please keep in mind that it is very toxic to animals and it will raise insulin levels slightly. These are the two most cited reasons for not using Xylitol.
First, a little background: Eric Westman, MD, director of the Duke Lifestyle Medical Clinic, explained to Health in a previous interview that in order to successfully follow the keto diet, you need to eat moderate amounts of protein, reduce your carb intake, and increase fats. When you reduce your carb consumption, your body turns to stored fat as its new fuel source—a process called ketosis. To stay in ketosis, followers of the keto diet must limit their carbs to 50 grams a day, Dr. Westman says.
Additionally, a ketogenic diet can improve your energy, cognitive acceleration and overall daily performance.  Most people feel their best when in a state of mild-ketosis.  One of the big challenges, is that most people have been raised on higher carb comfort foods.  So rather than focusing on what foods you will miss, shift your energy to all the great foods you can enjoy.  Here are 22 ketogenic foods that you will LOVE!
Pecans are my favorite in the fall-time. I love dry roasted pecans. They are easy to roast yourself, and they make your house smell amazing. To roast, first soak the nuts in water overnight. Then, drain and place on a baking sheet in the oven at 150 degrees Fahrenheit for 12-24 hours. Toss halfway and roast until the nuts are crunchy, and not soggy.
Many people love the ketogenic diet because it keeps them satiated for longer periods of time. As a result, snacking no longer becomes a necessity. However, snacking regularly is a habit that many people coming from a Standard American Diet have developed. Although you may not be truly hungry, you may still find yourself reaching for an afternoon snack to satisfy mental cravings. Instead of popcorn or chips, nuts are a great keto-friendly alternative.

Hi Liz, As far as the Swerve goes, most online calculators don’t subtract sugar alcohols when showing net carbs, so that may be the issue. Regarding the butter, all butter is keto approved (as long as it’s real butter). 🙂 If you calculated by hand, then let me know which ingredient is showing a lot of carbs for you and I can help determine what was off. The few net carbs in the recipe come from almond flour and cream cheese. The brands of pantry ingredients I use are linked in the recipe card (pink links). I use Kerrygold for the butter and Philadelphia for the cream cheese.
Thanks for your question. Yes, millet and quinoa are seeds; however, they are much higher in carbs than the seeds discussed in the article. Depending on your carb tolerance and goals, you might be able to include them in your diet in small amounts. But it's my understanding that they wouldn't provide any additional benefit for gut health beyond what the lower-carb seeds and nuts do -- in fact, I'd argue that nuts and seeds would be more beneficial. Most of the carbs in millet and quinoa are digested and absorbed in the small intestine, which wouldn't have any effect on the microbiome. By contrast, most of the carbs in the seeds and nuts I recommend in the article are mainly fiber, including soluble fiber, which does promote gut health. I hope that helps! - Franziska
Well, if you’ve been on the keto train for a while or just recently got your ticket punched then you know that this is a bunch of mumbo jumbo. In 2013, the European Journal of Nutrition study results showed the risk of obesity was not associated with high-fat dairy consumption (2). And a study done in 2018 by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that cardiovascular disease and stroke mortality was not caused by increased circulation of dairy fatty acids in the body (2). Now we know that cottage cheese is not the cause of your body looking like cottage cheese or your heart turning into it.

You can receive the FULL benefit of the 3-Week Ketogenic Diet without adding any exercise during the 3-weeks you'll be following the plan. If you choose to incorporate at least an hour of metabolic exercise during the week using my personal-trainer guided exercise videos, you'll see up to THREE times the results. Exercise contributes to hormonal balance, blood sugar stability, and lean muscle growth.


I made this on Monday, let it sit in the fridge overnight and it was fabulous last night (Tuesday) and still fabulous tonight (Wednesday). My only minor issue was that the cream cheese didn’t seem to get smooth after blending and so after the cake sat and we ate it, you could taste the crumbles of cream cheese. When I started to bend the mixture (using hand mixer) I started off slow, then sped up the speed thinking that would help remove the clumps. But then I saw your note about not over-mixing because that would cause air pockets. I continued to blend but at a lower speed then just put it in the pan to bake..thinking maybe the clumps would sort themselves out while baking. What do you recommend for next time? Either way, it was fabulous! Thank you!!!
Strawberries are another delicious, sweet, and filling fruit that you can eat in moderation on the keto diet. A ½-cup serving of sliced strawberries contains about 4.7 g of net carbs and 4.1 g of sugar. As there are only 27 calories in the aforementioned serving, you can eat strawberries raw, add a few pieces to your cereal, or blend a handful into a small low-carb smoothie. Strawberries also have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory benefits, per a study published in February 2010 in the Journal of Medicinal Food. The same ½ cup provides 48.8 mg of vitamin C (81.3 percent DV), 127 mg of potassium (2.7 percent DV), and 20 micrograms of folate (5 percent DV).
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